EERI 2016 AM

EERI 2016 Annual Meeting
Beyond the Epicenter,  Expanding Our Risk Perspective
April 5-April 8, 2016
San Francisco, California

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EERI Committee Meetings

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 6, 2016 5:30 to 7:00 p.m.

Learning From Earthquakes Program Executive Committee - Cyril Magnin III Room, Committee Members Only

THURSDAY, APRIL 7, 2015 7:00 to 8:30 a.m.

Strong Motion Forum - Embarcadero Room, Open to all

Earthquake Spectra Editorial Board - Fillmore Room, Committee Members Only

Public Policy and Advocacy Committee - Davidson Room, Open to all

THURSDAY, APRIL 7, 2015 5:30 to 7:00 p.m.

Oral History Committee - Mason Room, Committee Members Only

Women in Engineering-WISE - Fillmore Room, Open to all

Initiatives Development Committee - Davidson Room, Committee Members Only begins at 4pm

Student Activities Committee - Hearst Room, Open to all

FRIDAY, APRIL 8, 2016 7:30 to 9:00 a.m.

School Earthquake Safety Initiative Info Session and Program Committee - Mission Room, Open to all

Nominating Committee - Fillmore Room, Committee Members Only

Seismic Design Competition

The EERI Student Leadership Council (SLC) is coordinating and implementing the 13th Annual Undergraduate Seismic Design Competition (SDC) at the 2016 Annual Meeting.

The objectives of the competition are to:

Thirty teams from universities across the US and around the world will be competing in the SDC in San Francisco. Each team has designed a complex tall building model made from balsa wood (weighing no more than 7 pounds) that will be tested on a shaking table. Student teams are judged on their oral design presentation, their summary poster, the model's architectural design, their ability to fit within the design criteria and constraints, their analytical prediction of their model performance, and the response of their model during shaking table testing.

EERI and the SLC thank the sponsors of the 2016 Seismic Design Competition: FEMA, Computers and Structures, Inc., California Earthquake Authority, Degenkolb, Kinemetrics, Arup, and PG&E.

To view SDC rules, scoring details, and other criteria, visit the Student Leadership Council's 2016 SDC web page. You can also follow SLC activities on Facebook.

Visit the 2016 Seismic Design Competition webpage!

 

sdc schedule2016

Parc 55 San Francisco, A Hilton Hotel

Level 3 - Parc 55 San Francisco, A Hilton Hotel

Level 4 - Parc 55 San Francisco, A Hilton Hotel

Poster Sessions Wednesday/Thursday

Wednesday, April 6, 2015 Posters

Break (Sponsored by CEA) and Poster Session (Sponsored by MTS)

  • Effect Of Prior Strain History On Cyclic Strength And CPT Penetration Resistance Of Silica Silt

    Authors:
    1. Author: Adam B. Price
      Affiliation: University of California, Davis
    2. Author: Ross W. Boulanger
    3. Author: Jason T. DeJong
  • Decreasing Upfront Costs For Isolation Retrofit : Allowing System Flexibility

    Authors:
    1. Author: Adrian P. Crowder
      Affiliation: McMaster University
    2. Author: Tracy C. Becker
  • Effects Of Out-Of-Plane Deformation On The Lateral Instability Of Reinforced Concrete Structural Walls

    Authors:
    1. Author: Ana G. Haro
      Affiliation: North Carolina State University, Raleigh
    2. Author: Mervyn Kowalsky
      Affiliation: North Carolina State University, Raleigh
    3. Author: Rob Chai
      Affiliation: University of California, Davis
  • An Evaluation Of Damage Scenarios And Detection Methods In Mid And High-Rise Buildings Densely Instrumented By The Community Seismic Network (CSN)

    Authors:
    1. Author: Anthony Massari
      Affiliation: California Institute of Technology
    2. Author: Monica Kohler
      Affiliation: California Institute of Technology
    3. Author: Rob Clayton
      Affiliation: California Institute of Technology
    4. Author: Tom Heaton
      Affiliation: California Institute of Technology
    5. Author: Chris Janover
      Affiliation: Computers and Structures, Inc.
    6. Author: Demetris Demetriou
      Affiliation: University of Leeds
  • The Application Of Seer-Monalisa Intelligent System In Disaster Response Plan For Buildings And Bridges

    Authors:
    1. Author: Azlan Adnan
      Affiliation: University of Technology Malaysia
    2. Author: Reni Suryanita
      Affiliation: University Andalas
    3. Author: Patrick Tiong Liq Yee
      Affiliation: Nanyang Technical University, Singapore
  • Eeri Student Chapter Activities At The University Of Illinois At Urbana-Champaign

    Authors:
    1. Author: Christina Marelli
      Affiliation: University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
    2. Author: Alexander Tong
      Affiliation: University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
  • Tsunami Forces In Bridge Connections : Large-Scale Experiments And The Role Of Fluid-Structure Interaction

    Authors:
    1. Author: Denis Istrati
      Affiliation: University of Nevada, Reno
    2. Author: I. Buckle
      Affiliation: University of Nevada, Reno
    3. Author: A. Itani
      Affiliation: University of Nevada, Reno
  • North Carolina State University Student Chapter

    Authors:
    1. Author: Diego A. Aguirre
      Affiliation: North Carolina State University
    2. Author: Emrah Tasdemir
      Affiliation: North Carolina State University
    3. Author: David Overby
      Affiliation: North Carolina State University
    4. Author: Ana G. Haro
      Affiliation: North Carolina State University
    5. Author: Christopher Price
      Affiliation: North Carolina State University
    6. Author: Zacahry Krish
      Affiliation: North Carolina State University
  • A Student Pilot Program Of Eeri-Nyne Chapter: Field Trip, Project Tours, And Career Opportunities

    Authors:
    1. Author: Guillermo Diaz-Fanas
      Affiliation: Mueser Rutledge Consulting Engineers
    2. Author: S. Nikolaou
      Affiliation: Mueser Rutledge Consulting Engineers
    3. Author: A. Stavridis
      Affiliation: State University of New York at Buffalo
    4. Author: W. Lao
      Affiliation: HDR, Inc.
    5. Author: S. Saadat
      Affiliation: Gilsanz Murray Steficek, LLP,
  • Reducing The Cost Of Earthquake Safety

    Author: Hanns U. Baumann
  • Too Generous To A Fault? Is Reliable Earthquake Safety A Lost Art? Errors In Expected Human Losses Due To Incorrect Seismic Hazard Estimates.

    Author: James Bela
    Affiliation: Oregon Earthquake Awareness
  • Environmental Performance Assessment Of Building Under Seismic Events

    Authors:
    1. Author: Jaskanwal P. S. Chhabra
      Affiliation: Pennsylvania State University
    2. Author: Vaclav Hasik
      Affiliation: University of Pittsburgh
    3. Author: Gordon P. Warn
      Affiliation: Pennsylvania State University
    4. Author: Melissa M. Bilec
      Affiliation: University of Pittsburgh
  • Development And Applications Of Ground Motion Response Spectrum Match Tool

    Authors:
    1. Author: J.R. Jayamon
      Affiliation: Virginia Tech
    2. Author: F.A. Charney
      Affiliation: Virginia Tech
  • Risk Model For A System-Wide Dam Risk Reduction Program In Northern California

    Authors:
    1. Author: Jennifer L. Donahue
      Affiliation: Geosyntec Consultants
    2. Author: K. Wooddell
      Affiliation: Pacific Gas & Electric Company
    3. Author: J. Watson-Lamprey
      Affiliation: Watson-Lamprey Consulting
    4. Author: N. Abrahamson
      Affiliation: Pacific Gas & Electric Company
    5. Author: H. AbrahamsonWard
      Affiliation: Lettis Consultants International, Inc.
    6. Author: N. Lewandowski
      Affiliation: Lettis Consultants International, Inc.
  • Strong Motion Ground Response Analyses For High Frequency Engineering Applications

    Author: Jian Shi
  • Effect Of Shaking History On Cone Penetration Resistance And Cyclic Strength Of Saturated Sand

    Authors:
    1. Author: Kathleen Darby
      Affiliation: University of California, Davis
    2. Author: Jackie Bronner
      Affiliation: University of California, Davis
    3. Author: Ana Maria Para Bastidas
      Affiliation: University of California, Davis
    4. Author: Ross Boulanger
      Affiliation: University of California, Davis
    5. Author: Jason Dejong
      Affiliation: University of California, Davis
  • Current Situation On Seismically Isolated Buildings In The U.S. And Japan

    Authors:
    1. Author: Keiko Morita
      Affiliation: Fukuoka University
    2. Author: Chihiro Oguchi
      Affiliation: Tokyu Construction Co., Ltd.
    3. Author: Mineo Takayama
      Affiliation: Fukuoka University
  • Scalability And Sustainability In Uncertain Environments: Recovery From The Nepal Earthquakes, April 25 And May 12, 2015

    Authors:
    1. Author: Louise Comfort
      Affiliation: University of Pittsburgh
    2. Author: James Joshi
      Affiliation: University of Pittsburgh
    3. Author: Farhod Yuldashev
      Affiliation: University of Pittsburgh
  • Design Loads On Foundations To Achieve Structures Full Non Linear Capacity

    Authors:
    1. Author: Luciano Roberto Fernandez-Sola
      Affiliation: Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Azcapotzalco
    2. Author: Luis Fernando Hernandez-Rodriguez
      Affiliation: Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Azcapotzalco
  • Oregon Hazard Explorer For Lifelines Program (Ohelp): A Web-Based Geographic Information System Tool For Assessing Potential Cascadia Earthquake Hazard

    Authors:
    1. Author: Mahyar Sharifi-Mood
      Affiliation: Oregon State University
    2. Author: Michael J. Olsen
      Affiliation: Oregon State University
    3. Author: Daniel T. Gillins
      Affiliation: Oregon State University
  • Analysis Of Tex-Wash Bridge Under The Combined Effect Of Earthquake And Flood

    Authors:
    1. Author: Maryam Tabbakhha
      Affiliation: University of California, Berkeley
    2. Author: Albolhassan Astaneh-Asl
      Affiliation: University of California, Berkeley
    3. Author: Daniel Christian Setioso
      Affiliation: University of California, Berkeley
  • Revisiting Assessment Of Pre-Northridge Steel Moment Frame Connections With Weak Panel Zones

    Authors:
    1. Author: Matthew Michnewich
      Affiliation: Degenkolb Engineers
    2. Author: Alvaro Celestino
      Affiliation: Degenkolb Engineers
    3. Author: Garrett Hagen
      Affiliation: Degenkolb Engineers
  • Catastrophic Earthquake Facility Functionality Workshop: Transfering Tools And Resources For Improving Resilience To Healthcare Stakeholders

    Authors:
    1. Author: Megan Boston
      Affiliation: Johns Hopkins University
    2. Author: Caitlin Jacques
      Affiliation: Johns Hopkins University
    3. Author: Judith Mitrani-Reiser
      Affiliation: Johns Hopkins University
  • Energy-Based Design Method For Seismic Isolators In Highway Bridges

    Author: Nathan Jo
    Affiliation: California State Polytechnic University, Pomona
  • Post-Earthquake Resilience Of Steel Moment Frame Buildings

    Authors:
    1. Author: Rachel Chicchi
      Affiliation: Purdue University
    2. Author: Amit H. Varma
      Affiliation: Purdue University
    3. Author: Judy Liu
      Affiliation: Oregon State University
  • Seismic Repair Of Severely Damaged Bridge Piers

    Author: Ruoyang Wu
    Affiliation: University of Utah
  • Geometrical Buckling And Material Yielding Of Low Yield Point Steel Plates

    Authors:
    1. Author: Tadeh Zirakian
      Affiliation: California State University, Northridge
    2. Author: David Boyajian
      Affiliation: California State University, Northridge
    3. Author: Mohammad Hajsadeghi
      Affiliation: University of Liverpool
  • Overburden Stress Normalization And Rod Length Corrections For The Standard Penetration Test (Spt)

    Authors:
    1. Author: T. Tonguc Deger
      Affiliation: University of California, Berkeley
    2. Author: Raymond B. Seed
      Affiliation: University of California, Berkeley
  • Liquefaction Numerical Model Validation With The Liquefaction Experiments And Analysis Project (LEAP)

    Authors:
    1. Author: Trevor J. Carey
      Affiliation: University of California, Davis
    2. Author: Bruce L. Kutter
      Affiliation: University of California, Davis
  • Development Of N-Spectra, A New Intensity Measure To Improve The Prediction Of Structural Response Of Stiffness- And Strength-Degrading Structures In Earthquake Ground Shaking

    Authors:
    1. Author: W.P. Graf
      Affiliation: ImageCat, Inc.
    2. Author: Jerry (Yajie) Lee
      Affiliation: ImageCat, Inc.
  • Development Of A New Steel Moment Connection

    Authors:
    1. Author: Xin Qian
      Affiliation: University of California, Berkeley
    2. Author: Abolhassan Astaneh-Asl
      Affiliation: University of California, Berkeley
  • Disasters, Decisions, Development: A Case Study For International Partnerships And Pedagogy For Tsunami Hazard Risk Mitigation

    Authors:
    1. Author: Zahraa Saiyed
      Affiliation: Stanford University
    2. Author: Jenny Sukale
      Affiliation: Stanford University
  • Seismic Resilience Of The Electric Power Supply System During The 2015 Gorkha Earthquake

    Authors:
    1. Author: Max Didier
      Affiliation: Swiss Federal Institute of Technology
    2. Author: Aike Steentoft
      Affiliation: Swiss Federal Institute of Technology
    3. Author: Benedikt Grauvogl
      Affiliation: Swiss Federal Institute of Technology
    4. Author: Siddartha Ghosh
      Affiliation: Indian Institute of Technology
    5. Author: Bozidar Stojadinovic
      Affiliation: Indian Institute of Technology
  • Seismic Performance Evaluation of Non-Engineer Interfered MRT Based Reinforced Concrete Building

    Author: Prakash Basnet
  • USAID/OFDA PREPARE Program (Preparing Rescue and Emergency Personnel to Ameliorate the Response to Earthquakes)

    Authors:
    1. Author: F. M. Lanning
    2. Author: D. Ubico Durán
  • A Method to Develop a Simplified Finite Element Model for a Properly Anchored Electrical Switchboard Cabinet

    Authors:
    1. Author: Edwin Lim
    2. Author: Barry J. Goodno
    3. Author: James I. Craig
  • Simplified Approach for Seismic Response Evaluation of Skewed Bridges

    Authors:
    1. Author: Farahnaz Soleimani
    2. Author: Reginald DesRoches
    3. Author: Jamie Padgett
  • Is hazard resilience sustainable? A cost-benefit analysis to quantify building life-cycle economic and environmental impacts from designing for higher seismic forces

    Authors:
    1. Author: Sarah J. Welsh-Huggins
    2. Author: Abbie B. Liel
  • Using Legal Action to Improve Earthquake Safety

    Author: Mark N. White

Thursday, April 7, 2015 Posters

Break (Sponsored by Simpson Gumpertz & Heger) and Poster Session (Sponsored by SGH)

  • Shear Strength And Deformation Capacity Of Reinforced Concrete Shear Walls

    Authors:
    1. Author: Zeynep T. Deger
      Affiliation: Istanbul Technical University
    2. Author: Cagri Basdogan
      Affiliation: Istanbul Technical University
    3. Author: Polat Gulkan
      Affiliation: Istanbul Technical University
  • Eeri Younger Members Committee - Events & Highlights

    Authors:
    1. Author: Manny Hakhamaneshi
      Affiliation: University of Sheffield, UK
    2. Author: Erica Fischer
      Affiliation: Degenkolb Engineers
  • Effects Of Long Distance Earthquakes On Long Span Bridges And Tall Buildings

    Authors:
    1. Author: Abolhassan Astaneh-Asl
      Affiliation: University of California, Berkeley
    2. Author: Michael Leung
    3. Author: Sifat Muin
      Affiliation: University of California, Berkeley
  • What Is ‘Social Resilience’? Perspectives Of Disaster Researchers, Emergency Management Practitioners, And Policymakers In New Zealand

    Authors:
    1. Author: Alan H. Kwok
      Affiliation: Massey University, New Zealand
    2. Author: Emma E. H. Doyle
    3. Author: Julia Becker
    4. Author: David Johnston
  • Development Of An Empirical Formula For Computing The Fundamental Period Of Sidesway Vibration For Glulam Tudor Arches

    Authors:
    1. Author: A.K. Motorwala
      Affiliation: Virginia Tech
    2. Author: F. A. Charney
  • Linking Material Behavior To The Seismic Performance Of Fiber Reinforced Concrete Coupling Beams Without Diagonal Reinforcement

    Authors:
    1. Author: Angel Perez-Irizarry
      Affiliation: University of Wisconsin-Madison
    2. Author: Gustavo Parra-Montesinos
  • Seismic Performance of Curved Bridges on Soft Soils Retrofitted with Buckling Restrained Braces

    Author: Anurag Upadhyay
    Affiliation: University of Utah
  • Preliminary Analysis Of A “Strongback” System

    Authors:
    1. Author: Barbara G. Simpson
      Affiliation: University of California, Berkeley
    2. Author: Stephen A. Mahin
      Affiliation: University of California, Berkeley
  • Underground Pipeline Response To Permanent Ground Deformations

    Authors:
    1. Author: Christina Argyrou
      Affiliation: Cornell University
    2. Author: Thomas D. O'Rourke
      Affiliation: Cornell University
  • The Scec Broadband Platform And Cybershake: Comprehensive Earthquake Ground Motion Simulation Tools For Engineering Applications

    Authors:
    1. Author: C.A. Goulet
      Affiliation: University of Southern California, Los Angeles
    2. Author: C.B. Crouse
      Affiliation: AECOM Technical Services
    3. Author: T.H. Jordan
      Affiliation: University of Southern California, Los Angeles
    4. Author: R.W. Graves
      Affiliation: U.S. Geological Survey
    5. Author: K.B. Olsen
      Affiliation: San Diego State University
    6. Author: S. Callaghan
      Affiliation: University of Southern California, Los Angeles
  • Inelastic Response Of Reinforced Concrete'filled Steel Tube Pile-Columns In Sand

    Authors:
    1. Author: Diego A. Aguirre
      Affiliation: North Carolina State University, Raleigh
    2. Author: Mervyn J. Kowalsky
      Affiliation: North Carolina State University, Raleigh
    3. Author: James M. Nau
      Affiliation: North Carolina State University, Raleigh
    4. Author: Mohammed Gabr
      Affiliation: North Carolina State University, Raleigh
    5. Author: Gregory Lucier
      Affiliation: North Carolina State University, Raleigh
  • Rapid Repair Of Circular Rc Bridge Columns By Strategic Relocation Of Plastic Hinge

    Authors:
    1. Author: Emrah Tasdemir
      Affiliation: North Carolina State University
    2. Author: Zachary Krish
      Affiliation: North Carolina State University
    3. Author: Mervyn Kowalsky
      Affiliation: North Carolina State University
    4. Author: Jim Nau
      Affiliation: North Carolina State University
    5. Author: Rudolf Seracino
      Affiliation: North Carolina State University
  • Poster Presentation Of The Sesi High School Captsone Project

    Authors:
    1. Author: James Mallard
      Affiliation: University of California, San Diego
    2. Author: Lelli Van Den Einde
      Affiliation: University of California, San Diego
  • Seismic Performance Of A Structural Wall Building With Geometric And Reinforcement Discontinuities

    Authors:
    1. Author: John N. Hardisty
      Affiliation: University of California, Berkeley
    2. Author: Jack P. Moehle
      Affiliation: University of California, Berkeley
  • Seismic Resilience Of Transportation Networks Of Highly Populated Cities

    Authors:
    1. Author: Juan Manuel Mayoral
      Affiliation: Institute of Engineering at UNAM
    2. Author: Azucena Roman de la Sancha
      Affiliation: Institute of Engineering at UNAM
    3. Author: Sotiris Argyroudis
      Affiliation: Aristotle University
  • NEURAL ESTIMATION OF SEISMIC RESILIENCE OF TRANSPORTATION NETWORKS

    Abstract: Seismic resilience evaluation of transportation networks of densely populated cities located in highly active earthquake regions is studied using a neural estimation of the earthquake damage endured during extreme events. An artificial neural network (NN)

    Authors:
    1. Author: Juan Manuel Mayoral
      Affiliation: Institute of Engineering at UNAM
    2. Author: Azucena Roman de la Sancha
      Affiliation: Institute of Engineering at UNAM
    3. Author: Silvia Garcia
      Affiliation: Institute of Engineering at UNAM
    4. Author: Luis I. Roman
      Affiliation: Institute of Engineering at UNAM
  • Small Scale Blast Induced Liquefaction Testing

    Authors:
    1. Author: Kengo Kato
      Affiliation: Oregon State University
    2. Author: Benjamin H. Mason
      Affiliation: Oregon State University
    3. Author: Scott A. Ashford
      Affiliation: Oregon State University
  • A Framework To Estimate Vulnerability Of Buildings To Sidesway Collapse And Application To Representative 6-Story Steel Moment Frame Buildings

    Authors:
    1. Author: Kenny Buyco
      Affiliation: California Institute of Technology
    2. Author: Thomas Heaton
      Affiliation: California Institute of Technology
  • San Diego-Tijuana Earthquake Scenario

    Authors:
    1. Author: Konstantinos Kosmidis
      Affiliation: University of California, San Diego
    2. Author: Lelli Van Den Einde
      Affiliation: University of California, San Diego
    3. Author: Alvaro Celestino
      Affiliation: Degenkolb Engineers
    4. Author: Amine Aboufirass
      Affiliation: University of California, San Diego
  • Practical Nonlinear Modeling Of U-Shaped Reinforced Concrete Walls Under Bi-Directional Loading

    Authors:
    1. Author: Gian Piatos
      Affiliation: California State University, Fullerton
    2. Author: Kristijan Kolozvari
      Affiliation: California State University, Fullerton
  • A Virtual Team Collaborator Experience: Assisting The 2015 Eeri Nepal Reconnaissance Team

    Author: Martha Cuenca
    Affiliation: University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
  • Performance Of Hydropower Infrastructure After April 25, 2015 Gorkha Earthquake

    Author: Menzer Pehlivan
    Affiliation: CH2M
  • Investigating The Effects Of Temperature Change On Modal Properties Of A Highway Bridge Via Operational Modal Analysis

    Authors:
    1. Author: Mohammad Farshchin
    2. Author: Charles V. Camp
  • Shape And Size Optimization Considering Dynamic Constraints Based On Modified Colliding Bodies Optimization

    Authors:
    1. Author: Mohsen Maniat
      Affiliation: University of Memphis
    2. Author: Charles V. Camp
      Affiliation: University of Memphis
  • Seismic Analysis Of Reinforced Concrete Bridge Piers Under Main Shock-Aftershock Ground Motions

    Authors:
    1. Author: Byungmin Kim
    2. Author: Moochul Shin
      Affiliation: Western New England University
  • Assessment Of Axial Load Tranfer Of Coupling Beams Through Analytical Studies Of A Twelve-Story Coupled T-Walls Test

    Authors:
    1. Author: Negin A. Tauberg
      Affiliation: University of California, Los Angeles
    2. Author: John W. Wallace
      Affiliation: University of California, Los Angeles
  • Influence Of Ground Motion Duration On Structural Collapse Risk

    Authors:
    1. Author: Reagan Chandramohan
      Affiliation: Stanford University
    2. Author: Jack W. Baker
      Affiliation: Stanford University
    3. Author: Gregory G. Deierlein
      Affiliation: Stanford University
  • 2d Finite Element Analysis Of Post-Tensioned Beam-Column Steel Connections

    Authors:
    1. Author: Sepehr Movaghati
      Affiliation: University of Memphis
    2. Author: Adel Abdelnaby
      Affiliation: University of Memphis
  • Experimental, Numerical, And Analytical Studies On The Seismic Response Of Steel-Plate Concrete Composite Shear Walls

    Author: Siamak Epackachi
    Affiliation: State University of New York, Buffalo
  • Seismic Shear Demand On Columns Of Reinforced Concrete Special Moment Frames

    Authors:
    1. Author: Tea Visnjic
      Affiliation: Exponent
    2. Author: Marios Panagiotou
      Affiliation: Nabih Youssef Associates
    3. Author: Jack Moehle
      Affiliation: University of California, Berkeley
  • Performance Of Precast Bulb-Tee Girder To Integral Bent Cap Seismic Connections

    Authors:
    1. Author: Zhao Cheng
      Affiliation: Iowa State University
    2. Author: Sri Sritharan
      Affiliation: Iowa State University
  • Study On Interaction Between Rocking-Wall System And Surrounding Structural Systems

    Authors:
    1. Author: Qingzhi Liu
      Affiliation: University of Minnesota, Twin Cities
    2. Author: Catherine French
      Affiliation: University of Minnesota, Twin Cities
    3. Author: Sri Sritharan
      Affiliation: University of Minnesota, Twin Cities
  • Silica Sand F-65 Ottawa Characterization

    Author: Ana Maria Parra Bastidas
  • Comparative Study on Multiscale Nonlinear Dynamic Analyses of RC Shear Wall Buildings

    Authors:
    1. Author: In Ho Cho, Sai Yemmaleni
    2. Author: Ikkyun Song
    3. Author: Keith A. Porter
  • A Comprehensive Study on a Site-Specific Hazard Analysis for a Liquid Natural Gas Tank Station

    Authors:
    1. Author: A. Haji-Soltani
    2. Author: Shahram Pezeshk
  • Life After Graduation: How to Stay Involved with EERI

    Authors:
    1. Author: Manouchehr Hakhamaneshi
    2. Author: Erica C. Fischer
  • Seismic Retrofit of an Existing High-Rise Steel Moment Resisting Frame Using Supplemental Energy Dissipation Devices

    Authors:
    1. Author: Shanshan Wang
    2. Author: Stephen A. Mahin
    3. Author: Jiun-Wei Lai
    4. Author: Matthew Schoettler

Presenter Information

Wednesday, April 6, 2015 Presenters

  • Opening Plenary

    Time: 8:30am
    Room: Cyril Magnin II and III room
    Presenter: Laurie A. Johnson
    Affiliation: Laurie A. Johnson Consulting | Research
    Author bio: Laurie Johnson is an urban planner specializing in disaster recovery and catastrophe risk management. She has been active in research and consulting on recovery planning and management following many of the world's major urban disasters, including the Loma Prieta and Northridge earthquakes, the Kobe and Tohoku Japan earthquakes, Hurricane Katrina, and Canterbury New Zealand earthquake sequence. She is a member of U.S. Geological Survey's Science Application for Risk Reduction (SAFRR) team focusing on long-term recovery and policy issues arising from the HayWired scenario of a M7.05 earthquake striking on the San Francisco Bay Area's Hayward fault in April 2018. Dr. Johnson is also a visiting project scientist at the Pacific Earthquake Engineering Research Center (PEER) at the University of California-Berkeley, chairs the U.S. National Advisory Committee for Earthquake Hazards Reduction, and serves on the steering committee of GEER - the Geotechnical Extreme Event Reconnaissance organization and the board of directors of SPUR -the San Francisco Bay Area's civic and good governance organization. She is a long-standing member of the Earthquake Engineering Research Institute, American Institute of Certified Planners, and American Planning Association. She holds a Doctor of Informatics degree from Kyoto University, Japan and a Master of Urban Planning and Bachelor of Science in Geophysics, both from Texas A&M University.
    Presenter: Mark Petersen
    Affiliation: USGS
    Author bio: Dr. Mark Petersen was lead in developing the 1996 California state hazard maps (California Geological Survey) and the 2008 and 2014 National Seismic Hazard Maps (U.S. Geological Survey). He is currently the chief of the U.S. National Seismic Hazard Mapping Project of the U.S. Geological Survey in Golden, CO and also serves as a national coordinator for the USGS Earthquake Hazard Program. He is responsible for the USGS seismic hazard maps that are applied in modern U.S. building codes, implemented in earthquake insurance rates, and considered for public policy risk decisions. In addition to the U.S. hazard analyses, he has conducted seismic hazard assessments for Europe (Turkey), Central Asia, Southeast Asia (India, Thailand, Cambodia, Vietnam, Laos, Indonesia, Singapore, Malaysia), Central America and Caribbean (Panama, Puerto Rico, Virgin Islands), and South America (all countries). He received his doctorate of geophysics (seismology) from Columbia University (Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory) and is a registered geologist and certified engineering geologist in the state of California.
    Presenter: Brett Maurer
    Affiliation: Virginia Tech
    Author bio: Brett Maurer is a Ph.D. student working in the geotechnical engineering program in the department of civil engineering at Virginia Tech University, has been selected as the 2015-2016 EERI/FEMA NEHRP Graduate Fellow in Earthquake Hazard Reduction. Maurer's doctoral research focuses on the development of a revised Liquefaction Potential Index (LPI) for evaluating risk due to earthquake-induced liquefaction, a phenomenon that occurs in loose, saturated sandy soils subjected to dynamic loading.
    Abstract: Owing to the combination of densely-recorded ground motions, well-documented liquefaction response, and extensive geotechnical characterization, the 2010-2011 Canterbury, New Zealand, earthquakes resulted in a liquefaction case-history database of unprecedented size and quality. Analyzing in excess of 7,000 liquefaction case histories, this presentation explores various aspects of liquefaction hazard assessment and summarizes five years of pertinent research following the Canterbury earthquakes. Research thrusts to be discussed include: (1) assessing the performance of competing liquefaction triggering procedures for evaluating liquefaction potential; (2) investigating the efficacies of various liquefaction hazard frameworks, to include, among others, the liquefaction potential index (LPI) and liquefaction severity number (LSN); (3) investigating fines-content effects on the accuracy of liquefaction hazard assessment (i.e., are hazard assessments in silts as accurate as those in clean sands?); and (4) utilizing economic considerations (i.e., the consequences of misprediction) to make rational decisions with respect to mitigating liquefaction hazards. From each of these research thrusts, important lessons and remaining challenges will be succinctly summarized.
  • Community Resilience: What Are the Objectives and Outcomes?

    Time: 10:30am
    Room: Cyril Magnin II and III room
    Presenter: Claire Bonham-Carter
    Affiliation: AECOM
    Author bio: Claire Bonham-Carter is a Principal with AECOM with over 18 years of experience working on sustainability strategy projects for a range of public and private sector clients. She also specializes in climate vulnerability and risk assessments and adaptation plans across the US with projects completed or underway for the San Francisco Bay Area's Metropolitan Transportation Commission, the Los Angeles Metro, the Port of Long Beach, the County of Santa Clara, the Federal Highway Administration and the Capital Regional District in British Columbia. Claire manages AECOM's partnership with the Rockefeller Foundation 100 Resilient Cities (100RC) Program. AECOM is working with 16 cities across the 100RC network helping develop their resilience strategies including the San Francisco Bay Area cities, cities in Australia, New Zealand, Mexico, Ecuador,, Puerto Rico and Canada. Claire is on the board of the Urban Land Institute's National Sustainability Centre and for Ecodistricts.
    Presenter: Steve Moddemeyer
    Affiliation: CollinsWoerman
    Author bio: Steve Moddemeyer is a principal with CollinsWoerman in Seattle. He has more than 23 years of experience leading governments, land owners, and project teams towards increased sustainability. He specializes in creating tools and policies that lead to resilient infrastructure systems for neighborhoods, cities and new town developments. He has extensive experience with complex public/private development issues and the development of sustainable strategies for major capital improvement projects. He is Principal-in-Charge to develop resilience performance standards for Boulder County infrastructure, author of Seattle's Pre-Disaster Recovery plan, co-author of a Benefit Cost Analysis on policies to address seismic risk from unreinforced masonry buildings, and is working with the National Academy of Sciences' Resilient America Pilot Project in Seattle.
    Presenter: Patrick Otellini
    Title: Chief Resilience Officer
    Affiliation: City of San Francisco
    Author bio: Patrick Otellini is the newly appointed Chief Resilience Officer (CRO) for the City and County of San Francisco tasked with developing the city's resiliency strategy in conjunction with the 100 Resilient Cities initiative pioneered by the Rockefeller Foundation. Mr. Otellini was originally appointed by Mayor Ed Lee in October of 2012 as the Director of San Francisco's Earthquake Safety Implementation Program. This public policy driven group has recently passed unanimously approved pieces of legislation that range from mandatory retrofits of soft story building to post-earthquake repair standards with the goal of making San Francisco more resilient in the face of disaster. Prior to his appointment Mr. Otellini was a Senior Associate with A.R. Sanchez-Corea & Associates, San Francisco's premier permit and code consulting firm. His work there included the management of the permit and inspection process for over $2 Billion worth of construction in San Francisco. He Is a Certified Building Inspector through the International Code Council (ICC) and a Certified Fire Protection Specialist through the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA). Patrick lives in San Francisco with his wife and two children. He received his Bachelor's Degree from Westmont College in Political Science.
    Presenter: Chris D. Poland
    Affiliation: Chris D Poland Consulting Engineer
    Author bio: Chris Poland is a world renowned authority on earthquake engineering and champion of disaster resilience. His structural engineering career spans over 42 years and includes hundreds of projects related to the design of new buildings, seismic analysis and strengthening of existing buildings, structural failure analysis, historic preservation, as well as the development of guidelines and standards that are used worldwide. He was a Senior Principal, Chairman and CEO of Degenkolb Engineers during his 40 years with the firm from 1974 through 2014. Chris is the past Chair of the Advisory Committee to the National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program, and current Chairman of the Advisory Committee on Structural Safety of Department of Veterans Affairs Facilities. He served as the Chair of the American Society of Civil Engineers Seismic Rehabilitation of Existing Buildings Standards Committee completing multiple editions of both ASCE 31 and ASCE 41, standards for the evaluation and rehabilitation of existing buildings that are used worldwide. He is a past President, Treasurer, and Director of the Earthquake Engineering Research Institute and is currently a member of the Seismic Resilience Panel that oversees the institutes NSF Resilient Observatory Grant. Currently, Chris is a Disaster Resilience Fellow in the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and member of the team of authors that developed a Community Resilience Planning Guide (2015). His role is related to defining and preparing the over-arching guidance for the development of Community Disaster Resilience Plans by local communities. That framework is the initiating document for the NIST Community Resilience Program that will include the development of related standards, analytical tools, and model guidelines for use by cities to address the natural disasters they face.
  • Emerging Tools for Risk Awareness and Reduction

    Time: 2:00pm
    Room: Cyril Magnin III room
    Presenter: Curt B. Haselton
    Affiliation: Haselton Baker Risk Group
    Author bio: Curt B. Haselton, Ph.D., P.E., Professor and Chair in Civil Engineering at California State University, Chico, and Co-Founder of the Seismic Performance Prediction Program (SP3) and Haselton Baker Risk Group (hbrisk.com). Dr. Haselton's research is in the area of performance-based earthquake engineering, with focuses on building code development, collapse safety assessment, ground motion selection and scaling, damage and loss estimation, and the treatment of uncertainties. Dr. Haselton was recently the chair of the Building Seismic Safety Council team to rewriting Chapter 16 of ASCE 7.
    Abstract: This presentation covers the FEMA P-58 methodology and the newly-available Seismic Performance Prediction Program (SP3) commercial software to implement this methodology. FEMA P-58 is a rigorous method of seismic evaluation, based on a $12M 10-year FEMA project, which provides detailed estimates of building repair cost, repair time, and safety. The SP3 software is a commercial implementation of FEMA P-58, with the goal of making broad use of FEMA P-58 feasible in engineering practice. SP3 puts all of the components of a FEMA P-58 analysis into one place, and streamlines each step, making this analysis feasible in hours rather than days or weeks. The recent emergence of the U.S. Resiliency Council rating system will also be discussed, along with the related Resilience Based Design Initiative (REDi) method, which both build on the FEMA P-58 loss prediction method.
    Presenter: Anna Lang
    Affiliation: Rochester Institute of Technology
    Author bio: Dr. Anna Lang is an internationally recognized earthquake engineer now working to apply remote sensing technologies for disaster prediction and response. Anna has dedicated her career to addressing seismic design concerns in developing countries and is recognized for her research on confined masonry. She recently received the prestigious Intelligence Community Postdoctoral Fellowship Award from the Central Intelligence Agency. Anna is currently working on automating building inventory collection and creating three-dimensional visualizations of the built environment from remote sensing imagery. You can find out more about her work and get in touch at https://www.linkedin.com/in/annalang1. Anna lives with her husband and two children in Rochester, New York, where they eagerly await the end of her husband's medical residency. She longs for past days of professional bike racing and personal freedom, but rides along the Erie Canal with the kids are fun too. Anna recently bought a minivan.
    Abstract: Global communities are entering a new, devastating age of vulnerability to natural disasters. Skyrocketing populations, uncontrolled urbanization, and severe weather from climate change are making "mega-disasters" a more common occurrence, with the majority of losses occurring in developing countries. Although we possess the technology to curb the impacts from these events, we have far to go to efficiently assess community risk and disseminate that knowledge to decision-makers and citizens in an effective and intuitive manner. The Digital Imaging and Remote Sensing (DIRS) group at the Rochester Institute of Technology is working to address these challenges by utilizing the latest advancements in remote sensing and image processing. Dr. Lang will provide an overview of these technologies and discuss her work to develop a rapid and automated means to collect building inventories and visualize hazard exposure in three dimensions. Researchers at DIRS have pioneered the ability to reconstruct three-dimensional geometric data from satellite and aerial imagery sources. This advancement allows us to generate individual building models and display them on an accessible and navigable platform such as Google Earth. This procedure serves as the backbone of a broader computational framework to capture and aggregate individual building characteristics, including elevation, footprint, and even construction material type. An overview of this procedure will be presented, along with an exploration of demonstration sites in Rochester, New York, and Port-au-Prince, Haiti. Implementation of this effort draws together the latest advancements in remote sensing and image processing technologies and increasing global access to the internet. Satellite and aerial imagery can be obtained anywhere of interest with minimal lead times. The growing use and availability of unmanned aerial systems is likewise expanding collection capabilities with decreasing cost and time. Additionally, today's image processing capabilities offer a vastly improved and efficient method for cataloging and querying the built environment. Resolution capabilities of commercial satellites are now 30 cm planar and 15 cm elevation, with even greater resolution from aerial sensors. And at an ever-increasing rate, isolated and impoverished communities around the world are gaining internet access and joining the global community. We are at a pivotal time to take advantage of these technologies, integrate them into the risk modeling community, and utilize them to assess, visualize, and communicate natural hazard risk to global communities.
    Presenter: Ross S. Stein
    Affiliation: Temblor.net
    Author bio: Ross S. Stein is CEO and cofounder of Temblor.net, Consulting Professor of Geophysics at Stanford University, Scientist Emeritus at the U.S. Geological Survey, and President-Elect of the Tectonophysics section of the American Geophysical Union (AGU). He is a Fellow of the AGU and the Geological Society of America, was Editor of the Journal of Geophysical Research, and later chaired AGU's Board of Journal Editors. Stein received the 2012 Gilbert F. White Natural Hazards Award from AGU, gave a 2012 TEDx talk, "Defeating Earthquakes," and received the 2000 Eugene M. Shoemaker Distinguished Achievement Award of the USGS. In 2003, the Science Citation Index reported that Stein was the second most cited author in earthquake science during the preceding decade; he was tenth most cited during 1900-2010. In 2009, he cofounded the Global Earthquake Model, a public-private partnership building a seismic risk model for the world. Ross chaired GEM's Science Board through 2014. Stein is a member of the Resilient America Roundtable of the National Academy of Sciences, and the Natural Catastrophe Advisory Council of Zurich Insurance.
    Abstract: I will give a live demo of Temblor, a mobile-friendly web app. Temblor uses the best available public data and methods to make seismic risk personal, understandable, and actionable. Temblor is not trying to scare, soothe, or snow people, but rather to let people understand their seismic risk and compare it to other risks they protect themselves against. The app is ad free, free for non-commercial use, and it works throughout the lower 48. Temblor gives you the seismic hazard rank of your location anywhere in the United States. In its map, you can see the faults, quakes, landslides, and liquefaction zones around you. Today's quakes are red; the past month's quakes are green. You can click on quakes or faults to learn more. Given your home's construction year and square footage, you learn the likely cost for seismic damage, and how that cost could be reduced by retrofit, or the chances it would covered by insurance. In the Temblor blog (blog.temblor.net), we notify you about the latest quakes, provide insights, and post editorials about seismic safety and discoveries.
    Presenter: Ahmad Wani
    Affiliation: One Concern
    Author bio: Ahmad Wani serves as the CEO and Co-Founder of One Concern. He holds a graduate degree in Structural Engineering from Stanford University's School of Engineering. In January 2016, Mr. Wani was named by the Forbes magazine as one of the world's top thirty innovators, in its Forbes 30 under 30 edition, for his work in this field. Before coming to Stanford, Mr. Wani performed structural design and risk analysis for power plants for the Central Government of India.
    Abstract: Achieving rapid situational awareness following a natural disaster is a challenge for every emergency operation center. Past events have shown that the current practices of responding to 911 calls on first-come-first-serve basis, relying on social networks, and waiting for manual reports, do not adequately address this issue. Infact, most communication channels are stressed following a natural disaster and the most damaged areas have the greatest difficulty reaching out for help. One Concern empowers emergency managers achieve situational awareness after an earthquake using artificial intelligence on natural phenomena sciences.
  • Designing for Multiple Hazards

    Time: 2:00pm
    Room: Cyril Magnin II room
    Presenter: Jeffrey Berman
    Affiliation: University of Washington
    Author bio: Jeffrey Berman, is an Associate Professor at the University of Washington in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and the Director of the UW Structural Research Laboratory. He received his Ph.D. from the University at Buffalo and joined the UW in 2006. His research is focused on the seismic behavior of buildings and bridges, including the implementation of new technologies for improving performance. He received the 2005 J. James Croes Award from ASCE and the 2008 Milek Fellowship from AISC.
    Abstract: The M9 Project is a National Science Foundation supported research effort at the University of Washington to better understand the Pacific Northwest's (PNW) seismic risk to Magnitude 9 Cascadia Subduction Zone (CSZ) earthquakes and subsequent tsunamis and landslides, and to improve planning and resilience by exploring the benefits of an earthquake early warning system and novel methods of risk communication to stakeholders and the public. This four year effort is built around a large-scale computational model of the PNW that is used to simulate ground motions time histories for a broad range of large magnitude CSZ rupture scenarios and includes detailed modeling of the geological basins that are underneath Seattle, Everett, Tacoma, and Portland. The spatially distributed simulated ground motions are being used to: (i) investigate response of typical structures in the region, (ii) inform input for computational tsunami models to predict run-up depths, velocities and forces on coastal structures, (iii) predict the regional distribution of landslides, (iv) investigate the liquefaction potential around the region, and (v) to test newly developed earthquake early warning systems. The current and future results of this ongoing research are then being used in community planning exercises that explore aspects of risk communication and perception. At the 2016 EERI Annual Meeting, co-PI Jeffrey Berman will present an overview of the ongoing research project. The presentation will focus on the simulation of CSZ ground motions, their impacts on structural systems, and the modeling of CSZ generated tsunamis and their impacts on structures. More information on the M9 Project is available at: http://m9.ess.washington.edu
    Presenter: William Lehman
    Affiliation: Hydrologic Engineering Center
    Author bio: William Lehman is the lead developer of the Hydrologic Engineering Center's - Flood Impact Analysis (HEC-FIA) software package. He is an economist at the Hydrologic Engineering Center. He earned a BA in Mathematics (2006), a BA in Economics (2006), and a MS in Economics (2008), all from Oklahoma State University. William's experience has been in the field of life loss estimation for Dam and Levee Safety, as well as supporting Other Social Effects (OSE) for planning studies. Prior to working for the Hydrologic Engineering Center Mr. Lehman was an economist in the planning division at Little Rock District.
    Presenter: Keith Porter
    Affiliation: SPA Risk LLC
    Author bio: Dr. Porter is a Research Professor at the University of Colorado Boulder and Principal of the international risk consultancy SPA Risk LLC. He specializes in societal risk from natural disasters, seismic vulnerability of buildings, and 2nd generation performance-based earthquake engineering (PBEE-2). Notable works include the Mitigation Saves 4:1 benefit-cost ratio study, FEMA P-58 guidelines for PBEE-2, USGS's ShakeOut, ARkStorm, Tsunami Scenario, and HayWired scenarios, the Global Earthquake Model's vulnerability methodologies, and the Community Action Plan for Seismic Safety. He is a licensed Professional Engineer and author of 150 scholarly and professional works.
    Abstract: Damage to water supply systems profoundly affects society after earthquakes. Consequently, for several decades, researchers have developed water-supply loss models that address damage from earthquake shaking, liquefaction, fault offset, and landslide. A new stochastic simulation model is offered here that employs a fairly traditional loss-estimation approach, adding a few notable features: (1) It deals with the entire earthquake sequence, i.e., damage and recovery after the earthquake mainshock, aftershocks, and because of afterslip. (2) It offers an empirical model of service restoration with simplifications to avoid hydraulic analysis. (3) It addresses lifeline interaction by modeling how individual repairs are slowed by limitations in so-called upstream lifelines and other resources. The model is exercised on two Bay Area water supply systems subjected to the hypothetical but highly realistic HayWired earthquake sequence: a M 7.05 mainshock on the Hayward Fault in the eastern San Francisco Bay Area, plus 16 aftershocks of M 5 or greater. The model is validated several ways for each of the case-study systems. One utility anticipates using it to target vulnerable segments of its system for accelerated pipe replacement.
  • Using Legal Action to Improve Earthquake Safety

    Time: 4:00pm
    Room: Cyril Magnin III room
    Presenter: Mark N. White
    Affiliation: Law Offices of Mark N. White
    Author bio: Mark N. White is a Berkeley-based attorney who advises institutional clients on managing seismic risk in the legal arena. Mark practiced as a litigation partner at Pillsbury Winthrop Shaw Pittman LLC (formerly Pillsbury Madison & Sutro) for 25 years and has managed seismic risk challenges for clients throughout the West Coast and the Pacific since 1982. His website is http://www.markwhitelaw.com and he can be reached at mark.white@mnwhitelaw.com.
    Presenter: Joel B. Castro
    Affiliation: Castro & Associates
    Author bio: Joel Castro heads Castro & Associates, an AV-rated firm of construction trial attorneys specializing in complex multiparty litigation. He won a multimillion-dollar recovery for the 16 death and injury cases during the Northridge earthquake and won the first California death cases from the collapse of a URM building in the San Simeon earthquake. He won a $23 million jury verdict in the Monterey Hills land subsidence case. The firm handles complex seismic structures, transit-oriented developments, residential, commercial and industrial cases. Mr. Castro was honored with the Los Angeles County Bar Association's "Outstanding Construction Attorney Award" for 2015 and is a Top Rated Lawyer, a Super Lawyer, and a Multi-Million Dollar Attorney. Mr. Castro was featured in National Geographic magazine, National Geographic Channel's "Anatomy of an Earthquake" and in Forbes Magazine.
    Abstract: Unreinforced masonry (URM) and soft story buildings have been responsible for deaths and property damage in California in the past and will continue to do so in future earthquakes. As California awaits its next major earthquake, a renewed focus on retrofitting hazardous buildings statewide is occurring. What does an owner do when he is notified that he owns a "hazardous building" and should retrofit it to abate the dangerous condition, but financial restraints preclude retrofit action? What happens when a foreseeable event (earthquake, flood or hurricane) triggers the collapse of such buildings with resultant death and injury? Was the death or injury preventable but for the the owner's failure to act reasonably in the face of a known risk? We will address these issues under California law and the recent Myrick v. Mastagni case.
    Presenter: Abby Rubinson
    Affiliation: EarthJustice
    Author bio: Abby Rubinson is a consultant on international, environmental, and human rights law and has taught International Environmental Law as an adjunct professor at the University of San Francisco School of Law. As an attorney in the International Program of Earthjustice from 2010 to 2015, she submitted briefs and formal communications to the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights, U.S. federal courts, and United Nations treaty bodies and special rapporteurs on international environmental issues. Prior to that, she was one of plaintiffs' counsel in three international human rights cases brought under the Alien Tort Statute, Bowoto v. Chevron and Wiwa v. Shell, both related to oil operations in Nigeria, and In re South African Apartheid Litigation, related to apartheid-era abuses in South Africa. She also worked with Human Rights Watch as a post-graduate fellow and consultant, based primarily in Brazil. She received her B.A. from Duke University and J.D. from University of Michigan Law School.
    Abstract: I will present on the environmental movement's use of legal action to drive social change, with a view to where the earthquake community might be able to build on some of those successes and learn from some of the challenges. First, I will give background as to how legal action has become a useful tool for the environmental movement. I will briefly explain various approaches environmental advocates have taken toward goals such as better environmental protection in the form of environmental standards, and I will show where legal action can be particularly useful in achieving those goals. I will also describe some of the downsides of pursuing legal action, as well as where legal action may not be the most effective strategy in pursuing environmental protection, so that participants develop an understanding of the pros and cons of a legal approach. Next, I will present examples of successful uses of legal action to promote environmental objectives, highlighting elements that likely contributed to those successes. I will also note some of the challenges, again, so that participants can get a better sense of when the law may be a useful strategy for them. Finally, I will draw links between the characteristics behind successful legal action in the environmental context and potentially favorable characteristics for legal action by the earthquake community. The aim is for the participants (i) to understand when legal action is a particularly promising strategy; and (ii) to be able to apply that understanding to the objectives they are pursuing in the earthquake context.
    Presenter: René Vignos
    Affiliation: Forell/Elsesser
    Abstract: In many municipalities in California there are ordinances on the books that require building owners to retrofit or at least reduce seismic hazards in their buildings. While many owners will willingly fix their building once made aware of the hazard, there are still certain owners that will delay and avoid compliance by exploiting the over-worked bureaucracies' ability to enforce these laws. Legal action against such building owners is a great way to root out those owners who shirk their responsibility and thereby endanger members of the public with their decisions. The threat of legal action may also be a great way to compel more municipalities to add laws to their books to deal with the most seismically hazardous buildings in their communities. But, as often seen with other attempts to force certain societal behaviors through threat of lawsuits, the more powerful methods of social change can often come through education and social pressure. There are several innovative approaches being used or developed in seismic areas around the world that could have powerful effects in calling attention to seismic hazards including: educating municipalities on the effects of past earthquakes, municipalities requiring evaluations where requiring retrofit is politically difficult, educating the insurance industry seismic hazards to compel retrofits as a requirement of getting insurance coverage, educate the public through the media to publicize known seismic risks in our cities so that pressure can come from an informed citizenry, educate owners on their legal exposure given the current legal judgements recently made in California, engage local engineering organizations to donate services to low income owners who want to understand and deal with seismic risks (but don't have the resources to do so).
    Author bio: René Vignos is a Principal with Forell/Elsesser Engineers in San Francisco and a licensed structural engineer in California, Utah, Wyoming, and Oregon with over 20 years of experience in the seismic design of new buildings and the evaluation, restoration and retrofit of historic and non-historic structures. Mr. Vignos is currently leading the design of some new buildings on the Facebook campus and in the past has worked on several retrofits including the Utah State Capitol and California Memorial Stadium at UC Berkeley. Mr. Vignos is also a member of the San Francisco Code Advisory Committee.
  • Improving Seismic Safety of Schools

    Time: 4:00pm
    Room: Cyril Magnin II room
    Presenter: Rebekah Paci-Green
    Affiliation: Western Washington University
    Author bio: Dr. Rebekah Paci-Green is an assistant professor of Environmental Studies at Western Washington University where she teaches courses in natural hazards planning and disaster risk reduction. She is also Director of the Resilience Institute, where she oversees projects aimed at reducing disasters and enhancing community resilience. She has worked with countries across Asia to ensure school safety and worked with communities in the United States to reduce vulnerability and recover from disasters.
    Presenter: Brian Tucker
    Affiliation: GeoHazards International
    Author bio: Brian Tucker received a B.A. in Physics from Pomona College, a Ph.D. in Earth Sciences from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California, San Diego and a Masters in Public Policy from Harvard University. He headed the Geologic Hazards Programs of the California Geological Survey from 1982 to 1991. In 1991, he founded GeoHazards International, a nonprofit organization working to reduce the risk of natural hazards in the world's most vulnerable communities through preparedness, mitigation and advocacy.
    Presenter: Carlos Ventura
    Affiliation: University of British Columbia
    Author bio: Carlos Ventura is a Civil Engineer with specializations in structural dynamics and earthquake engineering. He has been a faculty member of the Department of Civil Engineering at the University of British Columbia (UBC) in Canada since 1992. He is currently the Director of the Earthquake Engineering Research Facility (EERF) at UBC, and is the author of more than 450 papers and reports on earthquake engineering, structural dynamics and modal testing. Dr. Ventura has conducted research about earthquakes and structural dynamics for more than thirty years. In addition to his academic activities, Dr. Ventura is a recognized international consultant on structural vibrations and safety of large Civil Engineering structures. He is a member of the Canadian Academy of Engineering and of the Engineering Institute of Canada, and Fellow of Engineers Canada. He is also a member of several national and international professional societies, advisory committees and several building and bridge code committees.
    Presenter: Yumei Wang
    Affiliation: DOGAMI
    Author bio: Yumei Wang is a civil/geohazards engineer at the Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI). She has since 1994 focused on building resilience to natural hazards. She currently serves on the National Academies liquefaction committee, has been an advisor to the National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program (NEHRP), to the 2013 FEMA-funded tsunami methodology development project and to the 2013 Oregon Resilience Plan, and has taken part in post-earthquake damage assessments including the 2011 Tohoku, Japan and 2010 Maule, Chile disasters. Wang has been a guest on PBS NewsHour, been interviewed by The New York Times, and appeared in documentaries produced by NOVA, National Geographic, and Discovery. Wang served as a Congressional Fellow in the U.S. Senate in Washington DC, and worked as a geotechnical consultant in California, including on the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake. She is on the Board of the Cascadia Region Earthquake Workgroup and is currently working for the Chief Financial Office at Department of Administrative Services (DAS CFO) on building resilience from the impacts of natural disasters.
    Presenter: Barry Welliver
    Affiliation: BHW Engineers
    Author bio: Barry H. Welliver has been involved in structural engineering since 1973. In California he worked for several prominent firms before establishing his own private practice in 1979. After twenty two years of residency, he moved with his family to Utah where he presently has a practice while maintaining his California office. He has been actively involved in the Structural Engineers Associations of Northern California and Utah, the Utah Seismic Safety Commission and the Earthquake Engineering Research Institute. He is currently chair of the School Earthquake Safety Initiative committee of EERI and has been a member of several Applied Technology Council projects including FEMA 154 3rd edition updates, FEMA 420 Engineering Guidelines for Incremental Seismic Rehabilitation and FEMA/ATC-122 School Hazard Safety Guide.

Thursday, April 7, 2015 Presenters

  • Learning from Earthquakes: Napa to Nepal

    Time: 8:30am
    Room: Cyril Magnin II and III room
    Presenter: Marko Schotanus
    Affiliation: Rutherford + Chekene
    Author bio: Marko is a structural engineer at Rutherford + Chekene in San Francisco. His experience includes advanced structural analysis, seismic evaluation and retrofit of existing buildings, seismic peer review, and new building design. Marko is a past chair and active participant in both SEAOC and SEAONC Existing Building Committees and subcommittees where he has participated in the development of various commentaries, standards and codes for the evaluation and retrofit of existing buildings. He was actively involved in reconnaissance following the 2014 South Napa Earthquake, the 2011 Christchurch Earthquake in New Zealand, the 2009 L'Aquila Earthquake in Italy, and is a Cal EMA certified Safety Assessment Program trainer. Marko served as the EERI Reconnaissance Team Leader for the South Napa Earthquake.
    Presenter: David Lallemant
    Affiliation: Stanford University
    Author bio: David Lallemant completed his PhD from Stanford University in 2015. His research focuses on understanding and quantifying the evolution of extreme risk in today's growing cities. He uses hazard modeling, engineering analysis, urban analytics, predictive modeling and spatial statistics for application in large-scale natural disaster risk analysis. The transdisciplinary and policy-oriented nature of his work has led him to build collaborations with the World Bank, Google, the Red Cross, the Global Facility for Disaster Reduction and Recovery and others. He holds a master's degree from UC Berkeley (2010) and bachelor's degree from MIT (2007). David is also active in post-disaster response and recovery, which forms the basis for his research on post-disaster assessment and community resilience. He worked for two years in Haiti following the 2010 earthquake and has been involved with the response and recovery following the 2015 earthquake in Nepal.
    Presenter: Surya Shrestha
    Affiliation: NSET
    Author bio: Mr. Surya Narayan Shrestha has a masters in Structural Engineering from the Institute of Engineering, Tribhuvan University and receiving a PhD from Tribhuvan University in Nepal with research in University of Basilicata in Italy. Mr. Shrestha works as Deputy Executive Director of National Society for Earthquake Technology (NSET), Nepal. As a structural engineer and risk reduction specialist Mr. Shrestha has worked as a team leader of several programs implemented by NSET. Mr. Shrestha has more than 15 years experience in Earthquake Risk Reduction in Nepal and the region. As a Deputy Executive Director, his major responsibilities are to provide regular guidance and monitor senior professionals of NSET for the implementation of its activities and operations of NSET.
    Presenter: Maryann Phipps
    Author bio: Maryann is a practicing Structural Engineer with over 30 years experience evaluating, designing and renovating facilities to remain operational after earthquakes. Hands-on experience designing hospitals, schools and laboratories for post-earthquake functionality has helped make Maryann a recognized expert in the seismic protection of nonstructural components. She was the lead technical consultant for FEMA P-74 Reducing the Risks of Nonstructural Earthquake Damage, and she is currently leading ATC-120, a NIST-sponsored project entitled Seismic Analysis and Design of Nonstructural Components and Systems, intended to advance the state of practice in this field. She was co-technical lead for FEMA P-1024, Performance of Buildings and Nonstructural Components in the 2014 South Napa Earthquake. Maryann is President of Estructure, a San Francisco Bay Area structural engineering firm, and a Past President and Fellow of the Structural Engineers Association of California.
    Presenter: Charles Huyck
    Affiliation: ImageCat
    Author bio: As a founding partner of ImageCat, Mr. Huyck develops the operational strategies for spatial technologies. He directs a team of engineers, scientists, and programmers developing software tools and data processing algorithms for loss estimation and risk assessment. He has over 20 years of experience integrating advanced geospatial technologies into CAT modeling programs. Recent interests include business interruption, heuristics for data cleaning, and crowd-sourced damage detection using remotely-sensed data.
  • Earthquakes and Social Justice: Protecting Vulnerable Populations in the U.S.

    Time: 10:30am
    Room: Cyril Magnin II and III room
    Presenter: David Friedman
    Affiliation: Forell/Elsesser
    Author bio: David is a Senior Principal, and emeritus President, CEO and Board Chair of Forell/Elsesser Engineers Inc., with over 40 years of professional practice (35 years at F/E!) in structural and earthquake engineering. His strength, gained over the breadth and depth of his career, is a holistic perspective of a projects’ planning, design and construction and the collaborative integration of creative structural solutions with architects, engineers and builders. With a specialty in seismic engineering and retrofitting of existing structures, particularly those with historic designation, David has solved numerous structural and earthquake engineering challenges during his career with Forell/Elsesser Engineers. Principal examples of his projects include the base isolation retrofits of San Francisco City Hall and the Asian Art Museum, the adaptive reuse and retrofit for the San Francisco Conservatory of Music, and the seismic safety corrections and remodeling of UC Berkeley’s California Memorial Stadium. David is devoted to world-wide seismic risk reduction and is a former director of the Earthquake Engineering Research Institute, and a current director of Build Change. He is also deeply involved in many other civic, philanthropic and not-for-profit Boards including The San Francisco Foundation, SPUR, UC Berkeley Foundation, Jewish Senior Living Group, Faultline Foundation and the United States Resiliency Council (USRC).
    Presenter: Kathleen Tierney
    Affiliation: National Hazards Center
    Author bio: Kathleen Tierney is a professor in the Department of Sociology and the Institute of Behavioral Science and director of the Natural Hazards Center at the University of Colorado Boulder. Kathleen's research focuses on the societal dimensions of hazards, disasters, and risk, and her current research interests include the political economy of disasters and hazard risk reduction, community resilience, and post-disaster business and economic resilience. She is a former distinguished lecturer, board member, and vice president of EERI. Kathleen most recent book, The Social Roots of Risk: Producing Disasters, Promoting Resilience, was published in June 2014 by Stanford University Press.
    Presenter: Rebekah Paci-Green
    Affiliation: Western Washington University
    Author bio: Dr. Rebekah Paci-Green is an assistant professor of Environmental Studies at Western Washington University where she teaches courses in natural hazards planning and disaster risk reduction. She is also Director of the Resilience Institute, where she oversees projects aimed at reducing disasters and enhancing community resilience. She has worked with countries across Asia to ensure school safety and worked with communities in the United States to reduce vulnerability and recover from disasters.
  • Issues at the Intersection of Geotechnical and Structural Engineering

    Time: 2:00pm
    Room: Cyril Magnin II room
    Presenter: Sjoerd van Ballogooy
    Affiliation: Tonkin + Taylor Ltd.
    Author bio: Sjoerd van Ballegooy is a senior geotechnical engineer and technical director at Tonkin + Taylor Ltd, a specialist geotechnical consultancy company in New Zealand. He received his undergraduate and graduate degrees from the University of Auckland, New Zealand. Since September 2010, Sjoerd has been involved in leading the geotechnical response to the damage caused by the 2010 - 2016 Canterbury earthquake sequence and in 2013 received the Queen's Service Order, Honorary Companion for his services to geotechnical science. His main roles involved overseeing the mapping of the land damage and building damage and the ground surface subsidence, helping the New Zealand Government in evaluate which land would be suitable for rebuilding and the New Zealand Earthquake Commission understand its land liabilities and identify which land is vulnerable to liquefaction and where the vulnerability has increased as a result of the physical changes caused by the earthquake sequence. Sjoerd has also architected the online geotechnical database system to manage, gather and disseminate the land damage data and geotechnical investigation data to the wider engineering community as well as lead a large ground improvement trial programme to evaluate the effectiveness of different ground improvement methods to enable the residential areas of Christchurch to be rebuilt with greater resilience to future damage using affordable solutions.
    Abstract: The 2010-2016 Canterbury Earthquake Sequence (CES) affected the Canterbury region of New Zealand resulting in widespread ground surface deformation, mainly due to liquefaction ejecta, liquefaction related volumetric densification of soils, topographic relevelling and lateral spreading, causing extensive land, infrastructure and building damage. The liquefaction affected 51,000 residential properties and damaged approximately 15,000 residential houses beyond economic repair. The total economic losses from the CES were in the order of $40B, with approximately one third of the economic losses being directly attributable to liquefaction. This presentation will examine the lessons learnt from the liquefaction damage and present a case study for a consideration of how we build our residential houses to be affordable, resilient and more readily repairable, by better matching building typology to the natural hazards that have the potential to occur. Five years on from the CES, the repair and rebuild residential houses damaged by the 2010-2011 earthquakes was substantially underway. New houses have been rebuilt either on shallow ground improvements or more robust foundation systems. On 14 February 2016 a MW 5.7 earthquake occurred in Christchurch, once again triggering liquefaction in the eastern suburbs. Preliminary observations of the effects of liquefaction on the new residential house portfolio are presented including comparisons of how the houses on shallow ground improvements and more robust foundation systems performed relative to the houses constructed prior to the CES. This aftershock event provides an excellent case study to evaluate the benefits of improving building resiliency.
    Presenter: Youssef Hashash
    Affiliation: University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
    Author bio: Youssef Hashash, Ph.D., P.E is the William J. and Elaine F. Hall professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He received his undergraduate and graduate degrees from MIT after which he worked in Dallas, Texas and San Francisco, California on a number of underground construction projects in the U.S. and Canada. Youssef joined the faculty of the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 1998. He taught courses in Geotechnical Engineering, Numerical Modeling in Geomechanics, Geotechnical Earthquake Engineering, Tunneling in Soil and Rock, and Excavation Support Systems. His research focus includes deep excavations in urban areas, earthquake engineering, continuum and discrete element modeling and soil-structure interaction. He also works on geotechnical engineering applications of visualization, augmented reality, imaging and drone technologies. He has published over 200 articles and is co-inventor on four patents. His research group developed the software program DEEPSOIL that is used worldwide for evaluation of soil response to earthquake shaking.
    Abstract: Underground structures are a key component of sustainable cities. In dense urban environments, underground structures are often built near tall buildings. Although such buildings have the potential to alter ground motions in their vicinity and transmit significant forces to adjacent underground structures during earthquakes, these impacts are not well understood. This presentation will describe a research program that includes centrifuge experiments and numerical analyses aimed at understanding the seismic performance of a braced excavation and a permanent box structure buried in medium dense, dry sand. The response of these underground structures is first studied in isolation, then, a model midrise and a high-rise building are added near the underground structures to evaluate their influence. Preliminary experimental results indicate that the presence of an adjacent high-rise building slightly reduces racking displacements on the buried structure, but increases seismic lateral earth pressures on the building side of the buried structure and the response can be captured using three-dimensional models. This enhanced understanding of the interaction of these structures is important to improving the resiliency of our urban infrastructure.
    Presenter: Ellen Rathje
    Affiliation: University of Texas at Austin
    Author bio: Dr. Ellen M. Rathje is the Warren S. Bellows Centennial Professor in the Department of Civil, Architectural, and Environmental Engineering at the University of Texas at Austin. She has expertise in the areas of seismic site response analysis, seismic slope stability, field reconnaissance after earthquakes, and remote sensing of geotechnical phenomena. She has published over 150 papers on these topics and has supervised the research of over 30 graduate students. Dr. Rathje is a founding member and current Co-Chair of the Geotechnical Extreme Events Reconnaissance (GEER) Association and she was a member of the Board of Directors of the Earthquake Engineering Research Institute (EERI) from 2010-2013. She is the Principal Investigator for the DesignSafe-ci.org cyberinfrastructure for the NSF-funded Natural Hazards Engineering Research Infrastructure (NHERI). She has been honored with various research awards, including the Huber Research Prize from the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) in 2010, the Hogentogler Award for outstanding paper from ASTM Committee D18 in 2010, the Shamsher Prakash Research Award in 2007, and the Shah Innovation Prize from EERI in 2006.
    Abstract: One dimensional site response analysis is one of the most commonly used numerical techniques in geotechnical earthquake engineering. Borehole arrays, where earthquake recordings are made at depth as well as the ground surface, provide invaluable data that can be used to assess the numerical techniques used for site response analysis. Borehole array recordings in the US and Japan are used to evaluate equivalent linear (EQL) analysis, equivalent linear analysis with frequency-dependent soil properties (EQL-FD), and fully nonlinear analysis (NL). The required damping to fit the small-strain response is shown to be larger than predicted by typical material damping curves derived from laboratory tests. At peak shear strains less than about 0.1%, all three site response techniques accurately predict site amplification relative to the borehole arrays. At peak shear strains larger than 0.1% and at periods less than about 0.4 s, EQL and NL analyses under-predict site amplification and EQL-FD analyses over-predict site amplification. Consideration of the shear strength of the soil when specifying the modulus reduction curve only slightly improves these comparisons. Additional research is needed to develop appropriate techniques to model large strain site response at periods less than 0.4 s.
    Presenter: Jonathan D. Bray
    Affiliation: UC Berkeley
    Author bio: Jonathan Bray is the Faculty Chair in Earthquake Engineering Excellence at the University of California, Berkeley. He earned engineering degrees from West Point, Stanford, and Berkeley. Dr. Bray is a registered professional civil engineer and has served as a consultant on several important engineering projects and peer review panels. He has authored more than 300 research publications on topics that include liquefaction and its effects on structures, seismic performance of earth structures, earthquake ground motions, and earthquake fault rupture propagation. He leads the Geotechnical Extreme Events Reconnaissance (GEER) Association. Dr. Bray is a member of the US National Academy of Engineering and has received several honors, including the Peck Award, Joyner Lecture, Huber Research Prize, Packard Foundation Fellowship, and NSF Presidential Young Investigator Award.
    Abstract: Several multi-story office buildings settled differentially and were damaged as a result of soil liquefaction during the 2011 Christchurch earthquake. The state-of-the practice still largely involves estimating building settlement using empirical procedures developed to calculate post-liquefaction, one-dimensional, consolidation settlement in the free-field away from buildings. Performance-based earthquake engineering requires improved procedures, because these free-field analyses cannot possibly capture shear-induced deformations in the soil beneath shallow foundations. Well-documented field case histories of office building performance in the Central Business District of Christchurch provide excellent benchmarks. Differential settlement of shallow-founded structures is often governed by liquefaction of shallow soils and the loss of ground due to the development of sediment ejecta. Shear strains due to shaking-induced ratcheting of buildings into cyclically softened soil are important effects that are not captured in current procedures. Dynamic SSI analysis can be used to evaluate building performance. Recommendations for estimating liquefaction-induced movements of buildings with shallow foundations are made.
  • Metrics and Models for Measuring Resilience

    Time: 2:00pm
    Room: Cyril Magnin III room
    Presenter: Laurie A. Johnson
    Affiliation: Laurie A. Johnson Consulting | Research
    Author bio: Laurie Johnson is an urban planner specializing in disaster recovery and catastrophe risk management. She has been active in research and consulting on recovery planning and management following many of the world's major urban disasters, including the Loma Prieta and Northridge earthquakes, the Kobe and Tohoku Japan earthquakes, Hurricane Katrina, and Canterbury New Zealand earthquake sequence. She is a member of U.S. Geological Survey's Science Application for Risk Reduction (SAFRR) team focusing on long-term recovery and policy issues arising from the HayWired scenario of a M7.05 earthquake striking on the San Francisco Bay Area's Hayward fault in April 2018. Dr. Johnson is also a visiting project scientist at the Pacific Earthquake Engineering Research Center (PEER) at the University of California-Berkeley, chairs the U.S. National Advisory Committee for Earthquake Hazards Reduction, and serves on the steering committee of GEER - the Geotechnical Extreme Event Reconnaissance organization and the board of directors of SPUR -the San Francisco Bay Area's civic and good governance organization. She is a long-standing member of the Earthquake Engineering Research Institute, American Institute of Certified Planners, and American Planning Association. She holds a Doctor of Informatics degree from Kyoto University, Japan and a Master of Urban Planning and Bachelor of Science in Geophysics, both from Texas A&M University.
    Abstract: A major challenge that communities face in assessing and measuring resilience involves interdependent lifeline systems. Currently lifeline system performance standards and goals are governed by a myriad of codes, standards, and guidelines for the design, construction and operation of individual systems and system components. Recently the National Institute of Science and Technology (NIST) has sponsored two projects to help address this problem. The first, Earthquake-Resilient Lifelines: NEHRP Research, Development and Implementation Roadmap (NIST GCR 14-917-33) (NEHRP Consultants Joint Venture 2014), developed a four-point program with 28 priority research, development and implementation topics to guide investments by NIST and other federal agencies in generating national performance goals for six key lifeline systems (e.g., electric power, gas and liquid fuel, water, wastewater, telecommunications and transportation) in concert with the development of needed codes, standards, guidelines, and manuals for key systems and components, and a coherent and well-coordinated plan to promote their voluntary adoption by communities and lifeline providers. The second, being conducted by the Applied Technology Council, is implementing one of the priority recommendations in the NIST Earthquake-Resilient Lifelines roadmap, to assess societal expectations of acceptable lifeline performance levels and restoration times with an expansion to consider seismic (including tsunami) as well as wind, flood, snow/ice and wildfire hazards. Ultimately, this project seeks to provide a technical foundation for first-generation systems-based models that will analyze community resilience and account for interdependencies among infrastructure systems and the social systems that they support. Conceptual thinking about resilience measurement also needs to consider the moment of resilience and whether resilience actions and interventions occur before or after the disaster onset. Frameworks like the Rockefeller Foundation and Arup, Community Resilience Framework (2014), the NIST Community Resilience Planning Guide for Building and Infrastructure Systems (2015), and the SPUR "Target States of Recovery for San Francisco Buildings and Infrastructure" (2009) have been primarily designed for and used in pre-disaster resilience planning, helping communities to craft a resilience vision and then to identify and prioritize actions or interventions leading to resilience ahead of disaster. By their very nature, disasters cause a simultaneous loss of capital across multiple societal systems putting them in a hyper-interdependent state. To be useful, post-disaster resilience measurements have to be conducted systematically and sustained over time in order to understand the recovery and resilience trajectories of different societal systems and the interdependencies among systems. The Canterbury Wellbeing Index and the Canterbury Wellbeing Survey, designed and implemented by New Zealand's national government in the aftermath of the 2010-2011 earthquake sequence, offer useful insights into the conduct of post-disaster, community-scale, resilience assessments and their potential value in recovery and resilience policy design and implementation.
    Presenter: Alan Kwok
    Affiliation: Massey University, Wellington, New Zealand
    Author bio: Alan Kwok is currently conducting his doctoral research on social resilience measurements at the Joint Centre for Disaster Research at Massey University, Wellington, New Zealand. His research focuses on the social factors that influence neighborhood resilience in Wellington and San Francisco and how local communities can assess and cultivate pre-disaster social resilience. Prior to his research, Alan was manager of American Red Cross' Ready Neighborhoods, an innovative four-year initiative designed to increase community disaster resilience by building community preparedness and response capacities in 50 targeted neighborhoods throughout the San Francisco Bay Area Region. The initiative was awarded with the Federal Emergency Management Agency's 2012 Community Preparedness Award.
    Abstract: As local communities begin to translate national and sub-national disaster resilience policies into practice, there is a growing need for governments and local stakeholder groups to identify resilience gaps and evaluate progress and investment strategies. Much of the existing research on resilience measurements assesses factors pertaining to a spectrum of societal domains, which includes social, economic, institutional, infrastructural, and natural environments. More recently, there is an increasing recognition on the importance of social resilience – the ability of groups or communities to cope with external disturbances – and how it contributes to community preparedness, disaster response and post-disaster recovery. However, despite a focus on social resilience by researchers and practitioners, there are tremendous variations in how social resilience is assessed. This presentation seeks to address the existing tools that measure social resilience, as well as the opportunities and challenges in evaluating programs that build resilience of the social environment at a community level. The first part of the presentation provides an overview of existing research and government efforts that assess community resilience in New Zealand. It reviews the Canterbury Wellbeing Survey that tracks recovery of post-earthquake Christchurch, resilience measurements in Auckland, as well as current tools that evaluate socioeconomic vulnerabilities and progress nationally. The second part of the presentation dives into how social resilience is defined and the key attributes that make communities socially resilient. It reports on the findings from a workshop that was conducted in late 2015 with academic researchers, emergency management practitioners from both public and private sectors, and policymakers from the government in the Wellington region. Although there are many facets to social resilience, a proposed core set of indicators is presented that serves as a foundation for understanding and measuring pre-disaster levels of social resilience of communities. The last part of the presentation bridges research and practice to identify ways forward. It discusses past and current efforts in New Zealand that increase social resilience of communities. It also highlights opportunities and challenges in developing metrics for assessing community resilience programs and tracking social resilience of people and communities.
    Presenter: Michael Mieler
    Affiliation: Johns Hopkins University/University of CA, Berkeley
    Author bio: Dr. Mieler is a Research Scientist with joint appointment at Johns Hopkins University and the University of California, Berkeley. His research focuses on characterizing the response of complex societal infrastructure systems to disturbances and stresses, including the development of novel tools and applications for communicating risk to decision makers, infrastructure operators, and other stakeholder groups. Currently, he is involved in a multi-institutional effort to develop an integrated model of a regional health care network to better understand the impact of natural hazards on the availability of critical health services following adverse events. Previously, he was a visiting researcher at GNS Science in New Zealand where he contributed to a diverse set of projects, including development of a web-based application for predicting seismic damage in near real time for the national rail operator and also a methodology for establishing a consistent hierarchy of performance objectives for a building and its myriad components. Dr. Mieler received his B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley in Civil and Environmental Engineering.
    Abstract: The built environment, which includes buildings, lifeline systems, and other engineered structures, plays a vital role in the normal functioning of a community, both in day-to-day operations and in the aftermath of a major disaster. As recent earthquakes in Chile, New Zealand, and Japan have demonstrated, damage to the built environment can generate enormous societal impact, ranging from displacement of individual families and businesses to disruption of entire economic sectors and community services. Consequently, a significant component in the effort to mitigate these cascading impacts involves developing new frameworks, methodologies, and tools for assessing the resilience of the built environment at multiple scales, ranging from individual facilities (e.g., a hospital) to networks of buildings and lifeline systems that support critical community services (e.g., a regional healthcare network). This presentation describes several new frameworks, methodologies, and tools for assessing the resilience of the built environment at different scales. First, it discusses recent advances in quantifying the resilience of individual facilities. These new tools and models, which build upon traditional structural analysis methods for estimating forces and displacements, aim to predict damage and evaluate its impact on functionality, downtime, and the services the facility provides (e.g., emergency surgery at a hospital). These models account for not only structural and nonstructural damage, but also the availability of important utilities, supply chains, and personnel. Next, the presentation describes efforts to measure the resilience of networks of buildings and lifeline systems. These network models integrate components from various modeling domains to predict how failures and outages throughout the built environment impact a particular network’s ability to support an important community service (e.g., healthcare). Last, the presentation describes an ongoing initiative of the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) to develop resilience-based performance standards for the buildings and lifeline systems. The intent of these new standards is to connect resilience metrics and objectives across multiple scales of the built environment, thereby ensuring that individual buildings and lifeline systems are designed to perform in a manner that is compatible with community-level resilience goals.
  • Moving from ideas to action: public policy for earthquake resilien

    Time: 4:00pm
    Room: Cyril Magnin III room
    Presenter: Sharyl J. M. Rabinovici
    Author bio: Sharyl Rabinovici received her Ph.D. in Public Policy from UC Berkeley with an emphasis on risk communication, disaster mitigation decision-making and behavior, and effective design and implementation of local mitigation programs. In 2014, she founded an independent consulting practice and has since completed survey and interview research, organizational strategy, and stakeholder engagement projects for a variety of entities involved in community resilience, including the California Earthquake Authority, the City of Palo Alto, and the Applied Technology Council. She was recently appointed as a Visiting Scholar at the Pacific Earthquake Engineering Research Center at Berkeley, currently serves on the Board of the US Resiliency Council, and is President-Elect for EERI's Northern California Chapter. Her background also includes two years as Visiting Assistant Professor of Public Policy at Mills College and five years with the US Geological Survey.
    Presenter: Arrietta Chakos
    Affiliation: Urban Resilience Strategies
    Author bio: Arrietta Chakos is a public policy advisor on urban resilience, working on community resilience strategies and multi-sectoral engagement. Her work as an advisor with the Association of Bay Area Governments focuses on resilience planning the S.F. Bay Area, emphasizing development of common resilience policies and implementation measures. The initiative, sponsored by the Federal Emergency Management Agency and the 100 Resilient Cities Initiative launched by the Rockefeller Foundation, engages communities to accelerate resilience action. Ms. Chakos is a member of the Resilience Roundtable and the Committee to Advise the U.S. Global Change Research Program at the National Academy of Sciences; she chairs the Housner Fellow committee at the Earthquake Engineering Research Institute. Ms. Chakos served as research director at the Harvard Kennedy School's Acting in Time Advance Recovery Project. She worked extensively in local government directing innovative risk mitigation initiatives, intergovernmental coordination, and multi-institutional negotiations at the City of Berkeley, California.
    Presenter: David Cocke
    Affiliation: Structural Focus
    Author bio: David Cocke, S.E., F. SEI, F. ASCE, founded Structural Focus in Los Angeles in 2001 after 20 years at a previous firm in California. He is a registered structural engineer in a dozen states and has an expertise in seismic evaluation, historic preservation, retrofit design and new structural design. Some of David’s more notable projects include the Annenberg Performing Arts Center in Beverly Hills, the Google Los Angeles headquarters, Red Bull North America headquarters, the Wilshire Boulevard Temple restoration in Los Angeles, multiple buildings at Dreamworks, Warner Bros. and Sony Pictures, and many others. David currently serves on the EERI Board of Directors, the SEI Board of Governors and has served on numerous Boards for the Structural Engineers Association in California, and on the Board of numerous preservation organizations. He is also the Managing Director of SAFEq Institute, an expert resource for building owners, risk managers, engineers, and local jurisdictions seeking to minimize facility and business interruption losses caused by disasters by establishing a program for first response post-disaster inspections.
    Presenter: Laura Samant
    Author bio: Laura Samant helps communities to understand and reduce their risk from earthquakes. She has worked with communities worldwide—from San Francisco, California to Kathmandu, Nepal —currently as an independent consultant. Her key interest is translating state-of-the-art technical knowledge about disaster risk reduction into feasible and effective policies and programs that make cities safer. Recent accomplishments include serving as a co-project manager for the City of San Francisco’s influential Community Action Plan for Seismic Safety program, which led to the City’s soft story retrofit ordinance and the development of its Earthquake Safety Implementation Program, and chairing San Francisco’s Private School Earthquake Safety Working Group, which led to mandatory seismic evaluations of private school buildings in the City. Laura Samant serves on the board of GeoHazards International, a non-profit focused on reducing natural disaster risk in developing countries before disasters strike, and as the Chair of the Earthquake Engineering Research Institute’s Public Policy and Advocacy Committee.
    Presenter: Yumei Wang
    Affiliation: DOGAMI
    Author bio: Yumei Wang is a civil/geohazards engineer at the Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI). She has since 1994 focused on building resilience to natural hazards. She currently serves on the National Academies liquefaction committee, has been an advisor to the National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program (NEHRP), to the 2013 FEMA-funded tsunami methodology development project and to the 2013 Oregon Resilience Plan, and has taken part in post-earthquake damage assessments including the 2011 Tohoku, Japan and 2010 Maule, Chile disasters. Wang has been a guest on PBS NewsHour, been interviewed by The New York Times, and appeared in documentaries produced by NOVA, National Geographic, and Discovery. Wang served as a Congressional Fellow in the U.S. Senate in Washington DC, and worked as a geotechnical consultant in California, including on the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake. She is on the Board of the Cascadia Region Earthquake Workgroup and is currently working for the Chief Financial Office at Department of Administrative Services (DAS CFO) on building resilience from the impacts of natural disasters.
  • Lifelines - Approaches to Mitigation

    Time: 4:00pm
    Room: Cyril Magnin II room
    Presenter: Thomas O'Rourke
    Affiliation: Cornell University
    Author bio: Tom O’Rourke is the Thomas R. Briggs Professor of Engineering in the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Cornell University. He is a member of the US National Academy of Engineering, Distinguished Member of ASCE, International Fellow of the Royal Academy of Engineering and a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He received a number of distinctions for his research and teaching, including from ASCE the Stephen D. Bechtel Pipeline Engineering, Ralph B. Peck, and Charles Martin Duke Lifeline Earthquake Engineering Awards, as well as the Le Val Lund Award for Practicing Lifeline Risk Reduction. He gave the 2016 Terzaghi Lecture and is receiving the George W. Housner Medal from EERI at the 2016 Annual Meeting. He served as President of the Earthquake Engineering Research Institute (EERI) and as the chair or member of many professional society committees. He authored or co-authored over 370 technical publications. His research interests cover geotechnical engineering, earthquake engineering, underground construction technologies, engineering for large, geographically distributed systems, and geographic information technologies and database management. He has served on numerous government advisory boards, as well as the consulting boards or peer reviews for many projects associated with highway, rapid transit, water supply, and energy distribution systems.
    Abstract: Lifelines are often grouped into six principal systems, including electric power, gas and liquid fuels, telecommunications, transportation, water, and wastewater systems. They are intricately linked with the economic well-being, security, and social fabric of the communities they serve, and may be regarded as the complex of delivery systems that define modern society and the communities within it. Professor O'Rourke will focus on lifelines as geographically distributed systems subject to various hazards, variations in hazard, and variable and uncertain conditions of repair and proximity to other lifelines. He will address approaches to mitigation by summarizing key lessons learned about lifelines during extreme events, including earthquakes, hurricanes, floods, and accidents. He will identify common features of lifeline systems that affect their performance under multi-hazard conditions, and will provide examples of critical dependencies and interdependencies among lifelines. Finally, he will propose a strategy to mitigate earthquake and other hazards that takes into consideration of the age and declining functionality of our infrastructure, institutional constraints that influence its management, and the local and global impacts that affect community resilience.
    Presenter: Craig Davis
    Affiliation: Los Angeles Water System Seismic Resilience Program
    Author bio: Craig A. Davis, Ph.D., PE, GE is the Water System Resilience Program Manager and the Seismic Manager for the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power, Water System. Formerly he held the positions of Geotechnical Engineering and Trunk Line Design Manager and oversaw nearly a billion dollars in the dam and reservoir development, large diameter pipeline installations, and Water System seismic improvement programs. Dr. Davis is currently developing a comprehensive LA Water System seismic resilience and sustainability program. He is a California licensed Civil and Geotechnical Engineer and received a B.S. in Civil Engineering from the California Polytechnic State University in San Louis Obispo, CA, an M.S. in Civil Engineering with emphasis in structural earthquake engineering from the University of Southern California in 1991, and a Ph.D. in Civil Engineering with emphasis in geotechnical earthquake engineering from the University of Southern California in 2000. He has worked for the LADWP since 1987 where he has investigated and evaluated numerous dams, managed several multimillion dollar projects, and implemented unique and innovative designs. Dr. Davis is appointed to the National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program (NEHRP) Advisory Committee on Earthquake Hazards Reduction (ACEHR). He is the founding Executive Committee chairperson for the ASCE Infrastructure Resilience Division. Dr. Davis participates in many other national and international professional committees involved in geotechnical engineering and lifeline system resilience and is the founding vice president of the International Society of Lifeline and Infrastructure Earthquake Engineering. Dr. Davis has also organized and coordinated numerous international workshops and symposiums on geotechnical engineering and lifeline system resilience.
    Abstract: The Los Angeles Water System is implementing a Seismic Resilience Program as part of a larger plan to improve the City's seismic resilience as outlined in the Resilience by Design report released by the Mayor December 8, 2014. The Water System Seismic Resilience Program comprehensively integrates into all aspects of water system business. The purpose is to continually improve the Water System seismic resilience in a manner that ensures its seismic sustainability and improves the resilience and sustainability of Los Angeles. Water System resilience is critical for providing the water delivery, quality, quantity, fire protection, and functionality service categories, all necessary for supporting community resilience. The goal of a resilient Water System is to limit the total number of service losses and restore the water service categories as rapidly as possible while protecting property, life safety, and the regional social and economic stability. This presentation reviews the Los Angeles Water System resiliency then provides brief descriptions of recommendations and potential tasks which may be implemented to accomplish the recommendations. Key aspects presented include: (1) Methods for improving the reliability of the Los Angeles aqueduct crossing of the San Andreas fault (SAF) and ability to provide water following a SAF earthquake; (2) the formation of a Seismic Resilient Water Supply Task Force consisting of three major water supply agencies for Southern California, the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power, the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California, and the California Department of Water Resources. The Task Force was created in 2015 to identify impacts of a seismic event which may impair imported water supply aqueducts, and to address the identified impacts with a regional approach; (3) Developing a Seismic Resilient Pipe Network; (4) Addressing the fire following earthquake risks in Los Angeles; and (5) creating a Resilient Expert Panel to provide independent expert input for the Los Angeles Water System Resilience Program.
    Presenter: Tom Shantz
    Affiliation: Caltrans
    Author bio: Tom Shantz is a senior research engineer for Caltrans, Division of Research, Innovation, and System Information. Tom’s primary focus is seismic hazard and geotechnical engineering. He manages Caltrans’ participation in the Pacific Earthquake Engineering Research (PEER) Center-Lifelines Program and works to implement their research in Caltrans.
    Abstract: Caltrans began addressing seismic deficiencies in our bridges following the 1971 San Fernando earthquake. While initially limited to installation of cable restrainers, the retrofit program rapidly expanded its scope following the 1987 Whittier Narrows earthquake and 20 years of intensive retrofitting followed. Non-toll bridges were retrofitted to meet a non-collapse performance goal while toll bridges were retrofitted to meet higher, bridge specific, performance goals. In all, roughly 2200 State owned bridges, 1250 locally owned bridges, and 7 major toll bridges were retrofitted or replaced. Last year, Caltrans initiated an effort to reassess State bridges for seismic vulnerability since the bulk of seismic retrofits occurred about 20 years ago. Since that time ground motion models have improved and previously unknown faults have been identified. Caltrans design practice has evolved as well, including the adoption of probabilistic procedures that increase design seismic loads near active faults. Also, for the first time, State bridges are being screened for liquefaction hazard and potential fault offset. On the research front bridge fragility has been the focus of several recent or on-going studies. Mechanistic based fragility models for new bridges have been developed and are now being cautiously applied. More challenging is the development of fragility models for existing bridges since these bridges reflect an extraordinary diversity of geometries, structural systems, age of construction and design standard. An on-going research study is addressing this complexity through the development of a detailed classification system based on bridge attributes found to have a large impact on fragility. Fragility models will be developed based on this classification system. Looking to the future, Caltrans recognizes that the single bridge focus of current fragility efforts must be extended to a more comprehensive assessment of a highway corridor. Corridor fragilities must include consideration of multiple bridges and the roadway itself. Operational performance characterization will involve a complex interaction of individual bridge performance, roadway performance, and potential reuse of arterials. As corridor performance estimates develop, prioritization decisions will be at the forefront. These decisions will be challenging as the needs of numerous stakeholders are considered. Scenario planning exercises should help to identify issues, facilitate discussion, and build consensus.
    Presenter: Dan Wade
    Affiliation: SFPUC
    Author bio: Daniel L. Wade, P.E., G.E., is the Director of SFPUC's $4.8 billion Water System Improvement Program (WSIP). At over 90 percent complete, the WSIP is one of the largest water infrastructure programs in the country, and will enable the SFPUC to provide reliable, affordable, high quality water in an environmentally sustainable manner to its 26 wholesale customers located throughout the Bay Area and to retail customers in San Francisco. The WSIP includes 83 water infrastructure projects, including the construction of a new dam, three tunnels, an ultraviolet treatment facility and large-diameter pipelines, as well as the rehabilitation and upgrades of existing storage, treatment and transmission facilities. The WSIP has received extensive industry awards and recognition, and Mr. Wade was recently named one of the 25 Top Newsmakers by Engineering News Record (ENR) magazine. Mr. Wade earned his B.S. Degree in Civil Engineering from the University of California at Berkeley, and his M.S. Degree in Civil/Geotechnical Engineering from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. Prior to joining the SFPUC in 2007, he worked as a consultant for 18 years in the water infrastructure industry as Principal Engineer and Vice President with MWH Americas.
    Abstract: Program Director Dan Wade will provide an inside look at the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission's (SFPUC) Water System Improvement Program (WSIP), a $4.8 billion program to repair, replace and upgrade critical portions of the Hetch Hetchy Regional Water System that serves more than 2.6 million customers in the Bay Area. In late 2002, voters approved a bond measure to allow the SFPUC to embark on this multi-year capital improvement program to upgrade its potable water system for purposes of improving seismic and delivery reliability, as well as meeting water quality requirements and long-term water supply goals. At over 90 percent completion, the WSIP is the largest infrastructure program ever undertaken by the City and the County of San Francisco and one of the largest water infrastructure programs in the nation. Mr. Wade will present background information on the WSIP, including the need for the program, criteria used to establish level of service (LOS) goals, prioritization of projects, challenges, and risks as well as the current status of the program. The program includes 83 projects spread across seven counties from California's Sierra foothills to San Francisco, including large diameter pipelines, tunnels, pump stations, treatment plants, dams and reservoirs. Several of the key WSIP projects will be presented. Mr. Wade will also discuss the need for continued long-term investment in the system to maintain the levels of service achieved by the WSIP.
    Presenter: Kent Ferre
    Affiliation: PG&E
    Author bio: Kent Ferre is Manager of the Geosciences Department at Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) in San Francisco, CA. He manages PG&E’s Earthquake Risk Management Program for the gas, electric and corporate real estate business units. Mr. Ferre is the Project Manager for the Diablo Canyon Seismic Hazard Update project. Mr. Ferre has over 30 years experience at PG&E working as a Design Engineer, Project Engineer, and Project Manager in many departments including Substation Engineering, Gas Transmission, and Power Generation. Mr. Ferre has been in the Geosciences Department since 1997. He is a Registered Civil and Structural Engineer in California.
    Abstract: The goal of the seismic risk management program at PG&E is to systematically reduce earthquake risks to an acceptable level, and to manage residual risks such that safety, damage control, and timely restoration of service are assured. The program is implemented by an interdisciplinary technical task force teams, reviewed by a steering committee consisting of department directors and vice presidents. All PG&E facilities except nuclear plants and dams (nuclear plants and hydro dams fall under the regulatory requirements of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the California Division of Safety of Dams respectively) are evaluated using consistent criteria according to potential impact on safety and importance to PG&E and its customers, and according to earthquake exposure and vulnerability. Those facilities that have significant risk of unacceptable earthquake performance are further evaluated and prioritized for mitigative action. Independent inspection, peer review, and verification are carried out to assure the company that the desired levels of earthquake performance of facilities and their operational systems are being achieved.

Friday, April 8, 2015 Presenters

  • Buildings: New Technologies and Protective Systems

    Time: 8:30am
    Room: Cyril Magnin II and III room
    Presenter: Hans-Erik Blomgren
    Affiliation: Arup
    Author bio: Hans-Erik Blomgren, a native of the Pacific Northwest, is an Associate and lead Structural Engineer in Arup's Seattle office with more than 18 years of experience in the design and construction of commercial development in the United States and across the globe. He has played a leading role in the design of the some of the region's most iconic structures such as the Seattle Central Library, Experience Music Project, and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation Headquarters Campus. The recent advancement of timber technologies in Europe and Canada have been studied and applied by Arup which is a multidisciplinary engineering firm working in 92 offices in 40 countries. Hans-Erik is recognized nationally for his role in cultivating and providing foresight for the application of these technologies in North American markets. Most recently Arup has had the fortune of being lead technical consultants for both the east and west coast USDA Tall Wood Building prize competition winners. When completed, they will be the first 10 story or taller full structural timber buildings in the United States.
    Abstract: Wood construction has been traditionally utilized to reduce inertial demands in high seismic regions. Applications however are often limited to low-rise buildings of light-wood construction with distributed load bearing shear walls. Recent advancements in timber technologies are pushing mass timber systems into larger commercial scale markets where steel and concrete systems currently dominate the landscape. In high seismic regions, mass timber buildings currently lack code-defined lateral force resisting systems. This paper presents a new concept of seismic force resisting system, known as the Heavy Timber Buckling Restrained Braced Frame. The system is intended, although not limited, for application to tall building timber construction, and is inspired by the unbonded brace technology today widely spread throughout Japan and the United States. In order to prequalify the system for future implementation in building codes, the paper first addresses component testing of a brace consisting of a steel core and a mechanically laminated glulam casing acting as the buckling-restraint mechanism. Test results are discussed and implementation at the system level in an archetype building is studied in order to assess overall system-level performance, constructability, and connection detailing.
    Presenter: Keri Ryan
    Affiliation: University of Nevada-Reno
    Author bio: Keri Ryan is an Associate Professor of Civil Engineering and a member of the Center for Civil Engineering Earthquake Research at the University of Nevada, Reno. She specializes in earthquake engineering and protective systems for high seismic performance, with application to buildings and bridges. She was the PI of the NSF funded Tools for Isolation and Protective Systems (TIPS) project to address impediments to the wider application of seismic isolation systems, and she led an international collaborative test program between the U.S. and Japan that conducted earthquake testing of a full scale building comparing conventional and alternative construction approaches. Ongoing research examines ways to ensure that high seismic performance objectives can be met. She has authored more than 50 publications on topics related to seismic isolation, high seismic performance, and life cycle analysis of structures.
    Abstract: Through a Memorandum of Understanding between the U.S. Network for Earthquake Engineering Simulation (NEES) and Japan's National Institute of Earth Science and Disaster Prevention, a full-scale shaking table test of a 5-story base-isolated was carried out at Japan's Hyogo Earthquake Engineering Research Center (E-Defense) in 2011. The building was tested with two different isolation systems (triple pendulum bearings and a hybrid system of lead-rubber bearings and low-friction rolling cross-linear bearings) and in the fixed-base configuration. The tested building had a realistic floor system, nonstructural components (suspended ceilings, sprinkler piping and interior walls), and furnishings, and was subjected to strong earthquake shaking. The tests served as a full-scale proof of the concept of seismic isolation to protect the building from damage in very strong earthquake shaking; for instance, displacement demands across the isolation system were more than twice what has been observed in any previous earthquake event. However, the nonstructural components and furnishings were not completely protected from damage, and the tests showed that these items were sensitive to the vertical component of ground shaking, which is unaffected by the seismic isolation system. While the overall performance of the isolation systems was very impressive when considered against other available options for seismic protection, the tests highlight the challenge of designing a building to remain immediately operational following a large earthquake. This presentation will summarize the test program, present the major findings, and discuss future directions in research and design practice.
    Presenter: Reid Zimmerman
    Affiliation: KPFF Consulting Engineers
    Author bio: Reid Zimmerman is a graduate of the University of California Berkeley and is currently an Associate with KPFF Consulting Engineers in Portland, OR. His career has focused on the analysis and design of advanced structural systems and emerging technologies in regions of high seismicity. Reid often pursues performance-based seismic design using nonlinear response history analysis on his projects and enjoys educating owners on the benefits of enhanced seismic performance. He also sits on select national code development committees on these topics.
    Abstract: The use of mass timber walls as a lateral force-resisting system in regions of high seismicity has gained recent interest in the United States. Mass timber walls, in the form of cross-laminated timber (CLT), laminated veneer lumber (LVL), laminated strand lumber (LSL), or similar, have been implemented outside the United States in lateral force-resisting systems, almost exclusively for wind load. Mass timber walls are natural candidates as a component in a rocking/re-centering system, owing to their inherent tendency to rock. While code provisions and design guidance for mass timber walls is sparse, when used in a rocking/re centering system, they can emulate a rocking precast concrete wall for which an approved code path exists. Additionally, their use in a rocking/re-centering system encourages consideration of beyond-code performance (e.g., low damage design, repairability design, etc.). Current implementation of re-centering mass timber walls in the United States is through the performance-based procedures of ASCE/SEI 7, typically substantiated through nonlinear response history analysis. Extending mass timber walls to taller buildings in the United States is feasible; however, it requires an additional level of thoughtful design, explicit analysis and testing, and careful detailing. These include: • Deformation compatibility of gravity connections—These connections are typically concealed for architectural reasons and, to date, have not been tested to story drifts expected of a tall building in a high seismic region. • Shear modulus of wood—Compared to reinforced concrete and steel, the ratio of an equivalent shear modulus to the elastic modulus of wood is much smaller. This results in the greater significance of shear deformations. Furthermore, equivalent shear moduli for mass timber panels, such as CLT, are not well bounded in the current literature and research. • Serviceability under wind loads—As re-centering mass timber wall buildings become taller, the effect of wind loads on base rocking and floor accelerations begins to become a critical aspect of design. • Post-tensioning loss—Post-tensioning loss due to wood creep and moisture change can be more significant than for a comparable precast concrete wall. This is further exacerbated in a tall building. The presentation will feature select examples from a case study project, Framework. The Framework Project is currently under design by KPFF Consulting Engineers and recently won the U.S. Tall Wood Building Prize Competition https://tallwoodbuildingcompetition.org Findings from a collaborative research project between the University of California Los Angeles and KPFF Consulting Engineers on the application of rocking/re-centering concrete walls for tall buildings will also be presented for comparisons against tall mass timber buildings.
    Presenter: James Ricles
    Affiliation: Lehigh University
    Author bio: James M. Ricles is the Bruce G. Johnston Professor of Structural Engineering and a faculty member of the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Lehigh University. James is also the Director of the Real-time Multidirectional Facility for Seismic Performance Simulation of Large-Scale Structural Systems, a NHERI Experimental Facility located at Lehigh University. James received his B.S. and M.S. from the University of Texas, Austin in Architectural and Civil Engineering, respectively, and Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley. His current research interests include: (1) seismic hazard mitigation and development of resilient buildings and bridges using innovative structural systems, including self-centering concepts as well as passive and semi-active controlled devices for earthquake damage reduction; (2) behavior of structural steel connections, members, and systems under extreme loading conditions, including seismic, fire, and blast loading; (3) real-time hybrid simulation for performance evaluation of structural systems under dynamic loading conditions. As the Director of the Lehigh NHERI Experimental Facility, James has been leading the development in large-scale real-time hybrid simulation, a technique that enables the development and experimental validation of resilient structural system concepts. He is a registered professional engineer in the State of California, and active in working with industry to disseminate and promote concepts for structural resiliency. James has published over 450 peer-reviewed journal papers, conference papers, and technical reports based in his research. He has received numerous research awards, including the 2013 American Institute of Construction Special Achievement Award (AISC) for his work related to designing steel structures for earthquake loading, including moment resisting connections and self-centering frames. Other noteworthy awards include the American Society of Civil Engineers Raymond C. Reese Research Prize, the National Science Foundation Presidential Young Investigator Award, the NASA Research Fellowship Award, and the Lincoln Arc Welding Foundation Chairman’s Award for Outstanding Achievement in Arc Welded Design.
    Abstract: Unlike conventional steel special concentrically-braced frames (SCBFs), rocking self-centering (SC) concentrically-braced frames (SC-CBFs) are designed to suffer no significant structural damage under the design basis earthquake (DBE), enabling the building to be functional after the DBE. Similar to conventional structural systems, SC-CBFs are designed to avoid collapse under the maximum considered earthquake (MCE). In general, SC systems have several features: the lateral force-drift behavior softens without inelastic deformation of the structural members; this softening behavior is created by gap opening at selected post-tensioned connections; and energy dissipation under seismic loading is not from damage to main structural members, but from energy dissipation elements that are specified in the design process. The seismic behavior of the SC-CBF is characterized by uplift of one column of the frame after the base overturning moment is large enough to overcome precompression of the column to the foundation from vertically-oriented post-tensioning bars. After column decompression and uplift, the behavior of the CBF is dominated by rigid body rotation (i.e., rocking). The presentation will show results of large-scale hybrid earthquake simulations on SC-CBF laboratory specimens, as well as numerical simulation results. The SC-CBF in this study was designed for no structural damage under the DBE, and minimal damage under the MCE. The simulations showed that these objectives were satisfied.
  • Learning from Earthquakes: Recovery Approaches from the Past 10 Years

    Time: 10:00am
    Room: Cyril Magnin II and III room
    Presenter: Robert B. Olshansky
    Affiliation: University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
    Author bio: Robert B. Olshansky, Ph.D., FAICP, is Professor and Head of the Department of Urban and Regional Planning, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, where he has taught for 25 years. His teaching and research cover land use and environmental planning, with an emphasis on planning for natural hazards. He has published extensively on post-disaster recovery planning, planning and policy for earthquake risks, hillside planning and landslide policy, and environmental impact assessment. Professor Olshansky has studied recovery planning and management after several major disasters. For over a decade, he and colleagues researched the recovery process following the Kobe, Japan earthquake of 1995, and he spent the 2004-05 and 2012-13 academic years as a Visiting Professor at Kyoto University. His co-authored research report, Opportunity in Chaos: Rebuilding after the 1994 Northridge and 1995 Kobe Earthquakes, is available online. His current work focuses on developing theory and researching the processes of recovery following catastrophic disasters. He researched and advised the post-Katrina planning process in New Orleans, and his book, Clear as Mud: Planning for the Rebuilding of New Orleans, co-authored with Laurie Johnson, was published by APA Press in April 2010. He and collaborators-with support from the National Science Foundation and University of Illinois-have researched and published on disaster recovery in Sichuan Province, China; Tamil Nadu, India; Taiwan; Indonesia; Haiti; and Niigata Prefecture and Tohoku, Japan. In 2014 he co-edited a special issue of the Journal of the American Planning Association on Planning for Disaster Recovery.
    Presenter: William Siembieda
    Affiliation: Cal Poly-SLO
    Author bio: William Siembieda, is Professor of City and Regional Planning and directs the College of Architecture and Environmental Design’s Resilient Communities Research Institute at California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, CA. Research areas include disaster mitigation planning, recovery theory, resiliency planning, and the operation of urban land markets. Recent work includes codirecting the State of California Multi-Hazard Mitigation Plan, and the Climate Adaptation Planning Guide. International work includes research at the Disaster Prevention Research Institute, Kyoto University, Japan, and the Joint Center for Disaster Research, Massey University, New Zealand. He is a disaster recovery subject matter expert to the World Bank, the Asian Development Bank, the US Department of Homeland Security, and the Chilean National Research Center for Integrated Disaster Management. A Fulbright Scholar and a Fulbright Specialist; Dr. Siembieda holds a Ph.D. in Urban Planning from the University of California, Los Angeles and an Economics B.A. from the University of California, Berkeley. He was a member of the 2010 EERI Chile LFE team and the 2014 GEER team on flooding and earthquakes in Christchurch, NZ. Recent scholarship includes: “The role of the built environment in the recovery of cities and communities from extreme events,” International Journal of Mass Emergencies and Disasters; “Rebuild fast but rebuild better: Chile’s initial recovery following the 27F earthquake and tsunami,” Earthquake Spectra, Journal of the Earthquake Engineering Research Institute; and “Transactions and friction as concepts to guide Disaster recovery policy,” International Journal of Disaster Risk Science, and “The Crisis Management System in Japan.” in Japan: A Precarious Future. (2015) New York University Press.
    Abstract: In 2015 Chile experienced three seismic events of 6.7-8.3Mw. There was minor damage from these events, and well-executed tsunami evacuations in coastal cities. There also were extreme flash floods and mudslides in the Atacama region (about 800 km north of Santiago), some of which included large amounts of contaminated soils. In 2014 there also was a massive WUI fire in Valparaiso (70 km west of Santiago) in six heavily populated ravines. This presentation focuses on the flooding and fire events, examining the recovery and reconstruction efforts and how the Chilean crisis management system is addressing these events in the most impacted cities.
    Presenter: Lizzie Blaisdell
    Affiliation: Blaisdell
    Author bio: Lizzie Blaisdell is the Director of Engineering for Build Change, a non-profit social enterprise that works with people in emerging nations to build houses and schools that don't collapse in earthquakes and windstorms. Since 2013, she has worked with the engineering teams in each of Build Change's programs to provide technical assistance to communities rebuilding after disasters, such as the 2010 earthquake in Haiti, the 2013 earthquake in Aceh, Indonesia, Typhoon Yolanda in the Philippines, and the earthquake in Nepal last April, as well as to communities implementing disaster mitigation programs, such as the City of Bogotå. She is a registered structural engineer in the State of California. Prior to working with Build Change, Lizzie had the pleasure of working at Degenkolb Engineers in San Francisco for nearly 8 years after receiving her Masters in Science at the SEMM program in U.C. Berkeley.

Exhibitors Information

Exhibitors:

  1. Reserved
  2. Reserved
  3. Reserved
  4. Kinemetrics • www.kinemetrics.comwww.kmioss.com
  5. FEMA • www.fema.gov
  6. Applied Technology Council • www.atcouncil.org
  7. Sage Engineers • www.sageengineers.com
  8. EERI • www.eeri.org
  9. Mueser Rutledge • www.mrce.com
  10. CSI • www.csiamerica.com
  11. Haselton Baker Risk Group • www.hbrisk.com
  12. Kleinfelder • www.kleinfelder.com
  13. MTS Systems Corporation • www.mts.com
  14. Taylor Devices Inc. • www.taylordevices.com
  15. Lettis Consultants International • www.lettisci.com
  16. GeoSig Ltd • http://www.geosig.com/
  17. Ringfeder • www.ringfeder.com
  18. PEER • www.peer.berkeley.edu
  19. COSMOS • www.cosmos-eq.org
  20. Wiss, Janney, Elstner Associates, Inc. • www.wje.com
  21. Amec Foster Wheeler • www.amecfw.com
  22. Raito Inc. • www.raitoinc.com

San Francisco Map

Tuesday

Tuesday April 5, 2016 9:00am-6:00pm Meet in the lobby of the Park 55 Hotel

Napa Earthquake and Winery Field Trip

The August 24, 2014 M6.0 South Napa Earthquake showcased fault rupture, building damage, and social and economic impacts in the nation's most prominent wine region. A tour bus will pick up attendees at the hotel and drive to three Napa stops. A discussion of the region's geologic history will be presented at Saintsbury Winery, one vineyard that experienced visible fault rupture. The group will be treated to lunch followed by a walking tour of downtown Napa where repair and reconstruction continues. The day will end with wine and views of the Napa Valley before the bus returns to the hotel. Number of participants capped at 45. Questions about this trip can be directed to Ken Mark at kmark@bechtel.com

Leaders:
Michael Germeraad / Josh Marrow
Cost: $100

Tuesday April 5, 2016 8:00am-12:00pm Market Street room

Rapid Visual Screening of Buildings for Potential Seismic Hazards (FEMA P-154) Training

Training on the Third Edition of FEMA P-154, Rapid Visual Screening of Buildings for Potential Seismic Hazards, covers methods and processes that enable users to rapidly identify, inventory, and screen buildings that are potentially seismically hazardous before earthquakes occur. Local officials can use these data to plan and prioritize further engineering and vulnerability analysis, emergency-response needs, and mitigation projects. This training is based on the third edition of the document published by FEMA in January 2015. Although some of the material remains unchanged from the second edition FEMA P-154 (published in 2002), the Third Edition provides major enhancements. The target audience for this training includes structural engineers, architects, other design professionals, building officials, construction contractors, architectural and engineering students, or other individuals with a background in building design and construction. Questions about this workshop can be directed to Veronica Cedillos at vcedillos@atcouncil.org

Instructor: Mike Griffin
Cost: $35 (covers A/V and venue fees)

Tuesday April 5, 2016 1:00pm-4:30pm Market Street room

Post-Earthquake Reconnaissance Workshop

This workshop will provide overviews of conducting post-earthquake reconnaissance in structural and geotechnical engineering and demonstrations of EERI field data collection tools. The workshop will include a field exercise that will give participants the opportunity to practice making reconnaissance observations using the demonstrated tools. EERI members who complete this training will be well-positioned to contribute effectively to reconnaissance efforts following an earthquake in their area.

Hosted by: The Student Leadership Council and EERI Learning from Earthquakes program
Cost: $30

Tuesday April 5, 2016 2:00pm-5:30pm Meet in the lobby of the Park 55 Hotel

Downtown San Francisco in Earthquake, Fire and Recovery Walking Tour

This walking tour will highlight the buildings that survived the earthquake and fire of 1906 and those built during the early reconstruction of San Francisco. We will be looking at steel-frame and brick load-bearing masonry buildings, primarily on Market and Mission Streets, examining damage from the 1906 earthquake and the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake. We will tour the interiors of the old Call (Claus Spreckel's) Building that survived the earthquake and fire and the Humboldt Bank Building, regarded as one of the most earthquake resistant and fire-resistant buildings of 1906 San Francisco. Our tour will be passing or touring through important pre- and post-earthquake buildings including the Atlas Building, the Wells Fargo Building, Burdette's Building, the Rialto Building, the Chronicle Building, the Aronson Building, the Phelan Building, Hoffman's Grill, the Sharon Building, and the Palace Hotel. Number of participants capped at 25. Questions about this tour can be directed to Ken Mark at kmark@bechtel.com

Leader: Stephen Tobiner, UCB
Cost: $20

Tuesday April 5, 2016 5:00pm-7:30pm Cyril Magnin Foyer

REGISTRATION OPENS

Tuesday April 5, 2016 5:30pm-7:00pm Cyril Magnin Foyer

WELCOME RECEPTION

The 2016 EERI Annual Meeting officially kicks off with food, drink, and a chance to catch up with colleagues and visit exhibitors. Join us!

Wednesday

Wednesday, April 6, 2016 7:00am Cyril Magnin Foyer

REGISTRATION OPEN

Wednesday, April 6, 2016 8:00am-8:30am Cyril Magnin II and III room

Welcome and Opening Statement

Speakers:
Mary Comerio, EERI Board President; Lindsey Maclise and Danielle Mieler, Organizing Committee Chairs

Wednesday, April 6, 2016 8:30am-10:00am Cyril Magnin II and III room

Opening Plenary Presentations and Recognitions

Welcome from EERI and the local organizing committee with an introduction to the 68th Annual Meeting. A review of recent USGS efforts focused on concerns at regional and national levels, including induced seismicity and Haywired, a scenario on ramifications on an Internet-dependent society in a sequence of earthquakes on the Hayward fault. Presentation by the EERI/FEMA Graduate Fellow on liquefaction research and awards to Reagan Chandramohan and Nathan Jo, winners of the 2015 EERI Student Paper Competition.

Moderators:
Lindsey Maclise and Danielle Mieler
Speakers:
Laurie A. Johnson, Laurie Johnson Consulting | Research; Mark Petersen, USGS National Seismic Modeling Project; Brett Maurer, EERI-FEMA NEHRP Graduate Fellow

Wednesday, April 6, 2016 10:00am-10:30am

Break (Sponsored by California Earthquake Authority)

Wednesday, April 6, 2016 10:30am-12:00pm Cyril Magnin II and III room

Community Resilience: What Are the Objectives and Outcomes?

For the past several years, many communities have initiated efforts to become more resilient. Additionally, organizations from the Rockefeller Foundation to the United Nations have implemented programs to enhance community resiliency. What outcomes should communities strive to achieve, and what outcomes are communities actually seeing? What can communities do to enhance their efforts? How can communities sustain resiliency efforts beyond current trends and funding programs? Although the focus will be on earthquakes, the degree to which earthquake resilience encourages broader resiliency will also be discussed.

Moderator:
Chris Barkley, AECOM

Speakers: Claire Bonham-Carter, AECOM;  Steve Moddemeyer, CollinsWoerman;  Patrick Otellini, City and County of San Francisco;  Chris Poland, Chris D Poland Consulting Engineer

Wednesday, April 6, 2016 12:00pm-2:00pm Embarcadero room

Lunch - EERI Distinguished Lecture, (Sponsored by ARUP and AMEC Foster Wheeler)
Title: "From Performance-Based Engineering to Earthquake Resilience"

Performance-based earthquake engineering has matured over the past twenty years from a conceptual framework into a formal methodology that can enable quantitative assessment of the seismic risks to buildings and infrastructure. Enabled by advanced nonlinear analysis, performance-based methods provide for more transparent design and decision making that takes advantage of the latest research in characterizing earthquake ground motion hazards, simulating structural behavior, and assessing earthquake damage and its consequences. Performance-based approaches are facilitating the design of innovative structures and influencing building code requirements and public policies for earthquake safety. Yet, many challenges remain to evaluate recovery from earthquake damage and implications on the socio-economic functions of society. This talk will examine the major developments in performance-based earthquake engineering and ways it can be applied to reduce earthquake risks and improve earthquake resilience.

Presenter: Gregory G. Deierlein, Stanford University

Wednesday, April 6, 2016 2:00pm-3:30pm Cyril Magnin III room

CONCURRENT SESSIONS

I. Emerging Tools for Risk Awareness and Reduction

How can engineers engage with communities to help better understand earthquake (and related) risk and what steps can they personally take to reduce that risk? This session will attempt to answer these questions by introducing new tools that make earthquake information and technology accessible to all. Panelists working on a wide range of applications will highlight features of their tools, describe their target audiences, and outline what they hope to achieve. Together, the audience and panel members will brainstorm ways to educate clients and the community about these tools, make their usage more widespread, improve them to better achieve their goals, and create value for engineers.

Moderator:
Lauren Biscombe, ARUP

Speakers: Curt Haselton, Haselton Baker Risk Group;  Anna Lang, Rochester Institute of Technology;  Ross S. Stein, Temblor Inc.;  Ahmad Wani, One Concern

II. Designing for Multiple Hazards

Often, we prepare and establish mitigation measures for earthquakes independent of other possible hazards. Tsunamis, fires, landslides, and atmospheric hazards, such as hurricanes, pose additional threats to communities and may cause deaths, disruption of commerce, and destruction of critical infrastructure. It is not incomprehensible that these hazards may occur simultaneously. Review of multiple hazards requires multi-disciplinary, collaborative work amongst practitioners in order to improve personal and business resiliency.

Moderator:
Jennifer Donahue, Geosyntec Consultants

Speakers: Jeff Berman, University of Washington;  Dana Brechwald, Association of Bay Area Governments;  William Lehman, Hydrologic Engineering Center;  Keith Porter, SPA Risk LLC

Wednesday, April 6, 2016 3:30pm-4:00pm

BREAK (Sponsored by California Earthquake Authority), and Poster Session (Sponsored by MTS)

Wednesday, April 6, 2015 4:00pm-5:15pm Cyril Magnin III room

CONCURRENT SESSIONS

I. Using Legal Action to Improve Earthquake Safety

In high seismic hazard areas across the U.S, vulnerable buildings pose significant risk to loss of life and injury during strong earthquake ground shaking. These dangerous buildings, such as those made of unreinforced masonry that have not been strengthened, remain unmitigated despite there often being awareness of their risk among government officials and building owners. What liability has been established through court cases or other vehicles, or could reasonably be assumed to exist, for government officials or building owners who do not mitigate buildings with known life safety deficiencies? What can the earthquake engineering community learn from other fields, such as the environmental movement, about using legal action to drive social change? How could legal action, or the threat of legal action, be used by advocacy groups to spur mitigation?

Moderator:
Justin Moresco, RMS

Speakers: Mark N. White, Law Offices of Mark N. White;  Joel Castro, Castro & Associates;  Abby Rubinson, EarthJustice;  Rene Vignos, Forell/Elsesser Engineers

II. Improving Seismic Safety of Schools

Schools are an integral part of communities and are critically important during and after disasters. If an earthquake occurs during school hours, the lives of the next generation depend on the structural safety of the school building and its contents. Recovery is deeply affected if schools are unable to re-open soon after an earthquake; in some cases, children never manage to return to school. Many communities plan to use their schools as emergency shelters after a disaster, yet this will not be possible if the school building is unsafe. There are many initiatives throughout the U.S. and abroad to improve the resiliency of schools. The purpose of this session is to share lessons learned and identify common issues and challenges in order to help strengthen each of these initiatives.

Moderator:
Veronica Cedillos

Speakers: Rebekah Paci-Green, Western Washington University;  Brian Tucker, GeoHazards International;  Carlos Ventura, University of British Columbia;  Yumei Wang, DOGAMI;  Barry Welliver, BHW Engineers, LLC

Wednesday, April 6, 2016 5:30pm-7:00pm

EERI COMMITTEE MEETINGS

Learning From Earthquakes Program Executive Committee - Cyril Magnin III Room, Committee Members Only

Wednesday, April 6, 2016 5:30pm-6:30pm Embarcadero Room

Meet the Leaders Event

Wednesday, April 6, 2016 5:30pm-7:00pm

SDC Auction, Model Presentation, and Poster Session (Sponsored by MTS)

Thursday

Thursday, April 7, 2016 7:00-8:30 am

EERI COMMITTEE MEETINGS

Strong Motion Forum - Embarcadero Room, Open to all

Earthquake Spectra Editorial Board - Fillmore Room, Committee Members Only

Public Policy and Advocacy Committee - Davidson Room, Open to all

Thursday, April 7, 2016 8:30-10:00 am Cyril Magnin II and III room

Learning from Earthquakes: Napa to Nepal

EERI participated in reconnaissance work after both the 2014 South Napa Earthquake and the 2015 Nepal/Ghorka Earthquakes. This session will address lessons learned from these earthquakes, how to measure recovery (e.g., quick reconstruction of a community in the same way vs. a slower recovery effort that involves relocation and/or integration of better standards), and corresponding challenges. Panelists will be asked questions to initiate discussion between the audience and panel experts. All participating panelists participated in reconnaissance efforts after the earthquakes, or conducted seismic-related research/work in the areas damaged by the earthquakes.

Moderator:
Erica Fischer, Degenkolb and Veronica Cedillos, ATC

Speakers: Marko Schotanus, Rutherford + Chekene;  David Lallemant, World Bank;  Surya Shrestha, NSET;  Maryann Phipps, Estructure;  Charles Huyck, ImageCat;  Daniel Zepeda, Degenkolb

Thursday, April 7, 2016 10:00-10:30 am

BREAK (Sponsored by Applied Technology Council)

Thursday, April 7, 2016 10:30am-12:00pm Cyril Magnin II and III room

Earthquakes and Social Justice: Protecting Vulnerable Populations in the U.S.

According to a recent ABAG study, vulnerable populations tend to live in buildings and in neighborhoods that are more susceptible to seismic and other land hazards such as liquefaction and flooding. In hurricanes Katrina and Sandy, damage disproportionately affected the more economically vulnerable populations. How can we learn from this to ensure that low income and vulnerable residents are not subjected to living in seismically unsafe buildings? Are we further compounding the problem with the introduction of seismic rating systems that don't require mandatory retrofit?

Moderator:
David Friedman, Forell/Elsesser Engineers

Speakers: Lindy Lowe;  Kathleen Tierney, Natural Hazards Center;  Rebekah Green, Western Washington University

Thursday, April 7, 2016 12:00pm-2:00pm Embarcadero room

Lunch - Honors and Business Meeting (Sponsored by PG&E)

Thursday, April 7, 2016 2:00pm-3:30pm Cyril Magnin II room

CONCURRENT SESSIONS

I. Issues at the Intersection of Geotechnical and Structural Engineering

Geotechnical earthquake engineering continues to make great strides in the advancement of the practice leading toward greater understanding of earthquake hazards. Current research, coupled with recent seismic events, is refining traditional concepts and moving from a deterministic (factor of safety) based analysis, to a probabilistic and risk-informed analysis. Additionally, evolving site characterization techniques further improves the ability to quantify hazards at specific locations and to specific lifelines.

Moderator:
Jennifer Donahue, Geosyntec Consultants

Speakers:  Sjoerd van Ballegooy, Tonkin & Taylor;  Youssef Hashash, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign;  Ellen Rathje, The University of Texas at Austin;  Jonathan D. Bray, University of California, Berkeley

II. Metrics and Models for Measuring Resilience: How do we quantify resilience?

As a follow-up to the session on community resilience, this session will focus on specific metrics used to quantify and evaluate resilience, including application to specific lifelines and infrastructure. The session will compare the performance and recovery expectations for different services/infrastructure and different hazards. Topics to address include: What road maps are there for developing a resilient city? How is progress towards resilience measured?

Moderator:
Chris Barkley, AECOM

Speakers:  Laurie Johnson, Laurie Johnson Consulting;  Alan Kwok, Massey University, NZ;  Michael Mieler, Johns Hopkins/ University of CA, Berkeley

Thursday, April 7, 2016 3:30pm-4:00pm

BREAK (Sponsored by Simpson Gumpertz & Heger) and Poster Session

Thursday, April 7, 2016 4:00pm-5:15pm Cyril Magnin III room

CONCURRENT SESSIONS

I. Moving from ideas to action: public policy for earthquake resilience

The earthquake engineering community has a wealth of ideas for reducing urban earthquake risk, but these ideas are not always translated to action and adopted by the wider public. The rarity of severe earthquakes in one location presents some unique challenges to galvanizing the public to take action, but we have had successes that demonstrate the possibilities.

Moderator:
Sharyl Rabinovici

Speakers:  Arrietta Chakos, Urban Resilience Strategies;  David Cocke, Structural Focus;  Laura Samant, Laura Samant Consulting;  Yumei Wang, DOGAMI

II. Lifelines - Approaches to Mitigation

This session will work to understand what lifeline systems are in a community and the impact of their vulnerability to different types of hazards. Social and economic impact of lifeline vulnerabilities will be explored, and authorities and jurisdictions involved will be discussed. Technical presentations that identify vulnerabilities and mitigating measures will be presented. Common and different approaches will be compared.

Moderator:
Grace Kang, PEER

Speakers:  Tom O'Rourke, Cornell University;  Craig Davis, Los Angeles Department of Water and Power;  Tom Shantz, Caltrans;  Dan Wade, SFPUC;  Kent Ferre, PG&E

Thursday, April 7, 2016 5:30pm-7:00pm

EERI COMMITTEE MEETINGS

Oral History Committee - Mason Room, Committee Members Only

Women in Engineering-WISE - Fillmore Room, Open to all

Initiatives Development Committee - Davidson Room, Committee Members Only begins at 4pm

Student Activities Committee - Hearst Room, Open to all

Thursday, April 7, 2016 7:00pm-8:00pm

SUBSCRIBING MEMBER & MAJOR DONOR RECEPTION

Friday

Friday, April 8, 2016 7:00am-8:30am

EERI COMMITTEE MEETINGS

School Earthquake Safety Initiative Info Session and Program Committee - Mission Room, Open to all

Nominating Committee - Fillmore Room, Committee Members Only

Friday, April 8, 2016 8:30am-9:45am Cyril Magnin II and III room

Buildings: New Technologies and Protective Systems

The session will consist of talks by selected speakers highlighting the development and implementation of new technologies and protective systems that enable resilient building performance. The session will feature a mix of researchers who are investigating the performance of new technologies and developing performance-based design methods, and practitioners who will present implementation examples. Example presentation topics include development and implementation of: (i) rocking and self-centering systems, (ii) innovative damping systems, (iii) protective systems for tall buildings, and (iv) performance-based design methods for new technologies.

Moderator:
Jeff Berman University of Washington

Speakers:  Hans-Erik Blomgren, Arup;  Keri L. Ryan, University of Nevada, Reno;  Reid Zimmerman, KPFF;  James Ricles, Lehigh University

Friday, April 8, 2016 9:45am-10:00am

BREAK

Friday, April 8, 2016 10:00am-11:15am Cyril Magnin II and III room

Learning from Earthquakes: Recovery Approaches from the Past 10 Years

The session will take a look back at some of the major earthquakes that have occurred over the past decade and assess where these communities are in their path to recovery. The session will aim to understand how different communities address recover and explore what type of recovery is “right” for a community. The session will specifically focus on the Chile, Tohoko, Christchurch, and the Mineral, VA, events. It will explore how the various communities have taken steps to address their risk, or if they haven't, why not?

Moderator:
Lindsey Maclise, Forell/Elsesser Engineers

Speakers:  Rob Olshansky, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign;  William Siembieda, Cal Poly State University;  Lizzie Blaisdell, Build Change

Friday, April 8, 2016 11:15am-12:45pm Cyril Magnin II and III room

Joyner Lecture and Seismic Design Competition Awards Ceremony
Title: "Site response uncertainty and its implications for seismic risk characterization"

This presentation offers fresh perspectives on the familiar topic of site response and its effects on seismic risk characterization. Although site effects are widely accounted for in engineering practice, limited understanding of underlying physical processes and limited availability of suitable analysis tools too often results in mis-characterizations. Intended for a broad audience, the speaker will address four main considerations:

  1. The physical processes responsible for site effects;
  2. The manner by which these processes are (or are not) reflected in relatively generic site factors used in GMPEs and in building codes;
  3. Effectiveness of site-specific geotechnical ground response analyses to estimate site effects;
  4. Recommended procedures for evaluating site-specific site response and its implementation in risk characterization for critical facilities.

Presenter:
Jonathan P. Stewart, University of California, Los Angeles

Friday, April 8, 2016 2:00pm-5:30pm Lobby of the Park 55 Hotel at 2:00pm or at 1500 Sansome Street at 2:45pm

Geotechnical/Geologic Overview of San Francisco's Telegraph Hill and Waterfront

This is a walking tour of the San Francisco's Telegraph Hill and vicinity. The tour will encompass Telegraph Hill, Coit Tower, the surrounding waterfront, and a trek up the Filbert Steps. Frank Rollo is a San Francisco native, raised in North Beach, and a geotechnical engineer with fascinating tales of San Francisco's slides, settlement, slips, quarries, faults, and fractures and their notorious past. Questions about this tour can be directed to Ken Mark at kmark@bechtel.com

Leader:
Frank L. Rollo
Cost: $20 (includes $2.25 transit fare if leaving from hotel)

Friday, April 8, 2016 3:00pm-7:30pm Meet in Lobby of the Park 55 Hotel

Bay Bridge and Golden Gate Bridge Boat Tour

Boat trip from San Francisco Pier, stopping at the Bay Bridge to hear about the new signature bridge and some of the construction/design issues affecting the potential seismic performance of the bridge. It also includes travelling to the Golden Gate Bridge to hear about the seismic retrofits that were carried out there. The boat will pass by Alcatraz and will arrive back at the pier near sunset.
Raphael Manzanarez was the Design Manager for the replacement of the 2.25 mile long East Span of the Bay Bridge. He was also responsible for the Seismic and Wind Retrofit of the Golden Gate Bridge. Questions about the tour can be directed to Ken Mark at kmark@bechtel.com

Speaker:
Rafael Manzanarez, Design Manager, ARUP
Transportation:
SF Muni F Line Street Car ride and Boat Ride on Hornblower Hybrid
Cost: $80

Tours

Tuesday, APRIL 5, 2016 9:00am-6:00pm

Napa Earthquake and Winery Field Trip

The August 24, 2014 M6.0 South Napa Earthquake showcased fault rupture, building damage, and social and economic impacts in the nation’s most prominent wine region. A tour bus will pick up attendees at the hotel and drive to three Napa stops. A discussion of the region's geologic history will be presented at Saintsbury Winery, one vineyard that experienced visible fault rupture. The group will be treated to lunch followed by a walking tour of downtown Napa where repair and reconstruction continues. The day will end with wine and views of the Napa Valley before the bus returns to the hotel. Number of participants capped at 45. Questions about this trip can be directed to Ken Mark at kmark@bechtel.com

Leaders: Michael Germeraad/Josh Marrow
Location: Meet in the lobby of the Park 55 Hotel
Cost: $100

Tuesday, APRIL 5, 2016 2:00pm-5:30pm

Downtown San Francisco in Earthquake, Fire and Recovery Walking Tour

This walking tour will highlight the buildings that survived the earthquake and fire of 1906 and those built during the early reconstruction of San Francisco. We will be looking at steel-frame and brick load-bearing masonry buildings, primarily on Market and Mission Streets, examining damage from the 1906 earthquake and the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake. We will tour the interiors of the old Call (Claus Spreckel’s) Building that survived the earthquake and fire and the Humboldt Bank Building, regarded as one of the most earthquake resistant and fire-resistant buildings of 1906 San Francisco. Our tour will be passing or touring through important pre- and post-earthquake buildings including the Atlas Building, the Wells Fargo Building, Burdette’s Building, the Rialto Building, the Chronicle Building, the Aronson Building, the Phelan Building, Hoffman’s Grill, the Sharon Building, and the Palace Hotel. Number of participants capped at 25. Questions about this tour can be directed to Ken Mark at kmark@bechtel.com

Leaders: Stephen Tobiner, UCB
Location: Meet in the lobby of the Park 55 Hotel
Cost: $20

2:00pm-5:30pm Friday

Geotechnical/Geologic Overview of San Francisco’s Telegraph Hill and Waterfront

This is a walking tour of the San Francisco’s Telegraph Hill and vicinity. The tour will encompass Telegraph Hill, Coit Tower, the surrounding waterfront, and a trek up the Filbert Steps. Frank Rollo is a San Francisco native, raised in North Beach, and a geotechnical engineer with fascinating tales of San Francisco’s slides, settlement, slips, quarries, faults, and fractures and their notorious past. Questions about this tour can be directed to Ken Mark at kmark@bechtel.com

Leader: Frank L. Rollo
Location: Lobby of the Park 55 Hotel at 2:00pm or at 1500 Sansome Street at 2:45pm,
Cost: $20 (includes $2.25 transit fare if leaving from hotel)

3:00pm-7:30pm Friday

Bay Bridge and Golden Gate Bridge Boat Tour

Boat trip from San Francisco Pier, stopping at the Bay Bridge to hear about the new signature bridge and some of the construction/design issues affecting the potential seismic performance of the bridge. It also includes travelling to the Golden Gate Bridge to hear about the seismic retrofits that were carried out there. The boat will pass by Alcatraz and will arrive back at the pier near sunset.
Raphael Manzanarez was the Design Manager for the replacement of the 2.25 mile long East Span of the Bay Bridge. He was also responsible for the Seismic and Wind Retrofit of the Golden Gate Bridge. Questions about the tour can be directed to Ken Mark at kmark@bechtel.com

Speaker: Rafael Manzanarez, Design Manager, ARUP
Location: Meet in Lobby of the Park 55 Hotel,
Transportation: SF Muni F Line Street Car ride and Boat Ride on Hornblower Hybrid,
Cost: $80

Workshops

Tuesday, APRIL 5, 2016 8:00am-12:00pm

Rapid Visual Screening of Buildings for Potential Seismic Hazards (FEMA P-154) Training

Training on the Third Edition of FEMA P-154, Rapid Visual Screening of Buildings for Potential Seismic Hazards, covers methods and processes that enable users to rapidly identify, inventory, and screen buildings that are potentially seismically hazardous before earthquakes occur. Local officials can use these data to plan and prioritize further engineering and vulnerability analysis, emergency-response needs, and mitigation projects. This training is based on the third edition of the document published by FEMA in January 2015. Although some of the material remains unchanged from the second edition FEMA P-154 (published in 2002), the Third Edition provides major enhancements. The target audience for this training includes structural engineers, architects, other design professionals, building officials, construction contractors, architectural and engineering students, or other individuals with a background in building design and construction. Questions about this workshop can be directed to Veronica Cedillos at vcedillos@atcouncil.org

Instructor: Mike Griffin
Location: Market Street room
Cost: $35 (covers A/V and venue fees)

Tuesday, APRIL 5, 2016 1:00pm-4:30pm

Post-Earthquake Reconnaissance Workshop

This workshop will provide overviews of conducting post-earthquake reconnaissance in structural and geotechnical engineering and demonstrations of EERI field data collection tools. The workshop will include a field exercise that will give participants the opportunity to practice making reconnaissance observations using the demonstrated tools. EERI members who complete this training will be well-positioned to contribute effectively to reconnaissance efforts following an earthquake in their area.

Hosted by: The Student Leadership Council and EERI Learning from Earthquakes program
Sponsored by: Wiss, Janney, Elstner Associates
Location: Market Street room
Cost: $30

Laurie A. Johnson, Laurie A. Johnson Consulting | Research

Author bio: Laurie Johnson is an urban planner specializing in disaster recovery and catastrophe risk management. She has been active in research and consulting on recovery planning and management following many of the world's major urban disasters, including the Loma Prieta and Northridge earthquakes, the Kobe and Tohoku Japan earthquakes, Hurricane Katrina, and Canterbury New Zealand earthquake sequence. She is a member of U.S. Geological Survey's Science Application for Risk Reduction (SAFRR) team focusing on long-term recovery and policy issues arising from the HayWired scenario of a M7.05 earthquake striking on the San Francisco Bay Area's Hayward fault in April 2018. Dr. Johnson is also a visiting project scientist at the Pacific Earthquake Engineering Research Center (PEER) at the University of California-Berkeley, chairs the U.S. National Advisory Committee for Earthquake Hazards Reduction, and serves on the steering committee of GEER - the Geotechnical Extreme Event Reconnaissance organization and the board of directors of SPUR -the San Francisco Bay Area's civic and good governance organization. She is a long-standing member of the Earthquake Engineering Research Institute, American Institute of Certified Planners, and American Planning Association. She holds a Doctor of Informatics degree from Kyoto University, Japan and a Master of Urban Planning and Bachelor of Science in Geophysics, both from Texas A&M University.

Mark Petersen, USGS

Author bio: Dr. Mark Petersen was lead in developing the 1996 California state hazard maps (California Geological Survey) and the 2008 and 2014 National Seismic Hazard Maps (U.S. Geological Survey). He is currently the chief of the U.S. National Seismic Hazard Mapping Project of the U.S. Geological Survey in Golden, CO and also serves as a national coordinator for the USGS Earthquake Hazard Program. He is responsible for the USGS seismic hazard maps that are applied in modern U.S. building codes, implemented in earthquake insurance rates, and considered for public policy risk decisions. In addition to the U.S. hazard analyses, he has conducted seismic hazard assessments for Europe (Turkey), Central Asia, Southeast Asia (India, Thailand, Cambodia, Vietnam, Laos, Indonesia, Singapore, Malaysia), Central America and Caribbean (Panama, Puerto Rico, Virgin Islands), and South America (all countries). He received his doctorate of geophysics (seismology) from Columbia University (Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory) and is a registered geologist and certified engineering geologist in the state of California.

Brett Maurer, Virginia Tech

Author bio: Brett Maurer is a Ph.D. student working in the geotechnical engineering program in the department of civil engineering at Virginia Tech University, has been selected as the 2015-2016 EERI/FEMA NEHRP Graduate Fellow in Earthquake Hazard Reduction. Maurer's doctoral research focuses on the development of a revised Liquefaction Potential Index (LPI) for evaluating risk due to earthquake-induced liquefaction, a phenomenon that occurs in loose, saturated sandy soils subjected to dynamic loading.
Abstract: Owing to the combination of densely-recorded ground motions, well-documented liquefaction response, and extensive geotechnical characterization, the 2010-2011 Canterbury, New Zealand, earthquakes resulted in a liquefaction case-history database of unprecedented size and quality. Analyzing in excess of 7,000 liquefaction case histories, this presentation explores various aspects of liquefaction hazard assessment and summarizes five years of pertinent research following the Canterbury earthquakes. Research thrusts to be discussed include: (1) assessing the performance of competing liquefaction triggering procedures for evaluating liquefaction potential; (2) investigating the efficacies of various liquefaction hazard frameworks, to include, among others, the liquefaction potential index (LPI) and liquefaction severity number (LSN); (3) investigating fines-content effects on the accuracy of liquefaction hazard assessment (i.e., are hazard assessments in silts as accurate as those in clean sands?); and (4) utilizing economic considerations (i.e., the consequences of misprediction) to make rational decisions with respect to mitigating liquefaction hazards. From each of these research thrusts, important lessons and remaining challenges will be succinctly summarized.

Claire Bonham-Carter, AECOM

Author bio: Claire Bonham-Carter is a Principal with AECOM with over 18 years of experience working on sustainability strategy projects for a range of public and private sector clients. She also specializes in climate vulnerability and risk assessments and adaptation plans across the US with projects completed or underway for the San Francisco Bay Area's Metropolitan Transportation Commission, the Los Angeles Metro, the Port of Long Beach, the County of Santa Clara, the Federal Highway Administration and the Capital Regional District in British Columbia. Claire manages AECOM's partnership with the Rockefeller Foundation 100 Resilient Cities (100RC) Program. AECOM is working with 16 cities across the 100RC network helping develop their resilience strategies including the San Francisco Bay Area cities, cities in Australia, New Zealand, Mexico, Ecuador,, Puerto Rico and Canada. Claire is on the board of the Urban Land Institute's National Sustainability Centre and for Ecodistricts.

Steve Moddemeyer, CollinsWoerman

Author bio: Steve Moddemeyer is a principal with CollinsWoerman in Seattle. He has more than 23 years of experience leading governments, land owners, and project teams towards increased sustainability. He specializes in creating tools and policies that lead to resilient infrastructure systems for neighborhoods, cities and new town developments. He has extensive experience with complex public/private development issues and the development of sustainable strategies for major capital improvement projects. He is Principal-in-Charge to develop resilience performance standards for Boulder County infrastructure, author of Seattle's Pre-Disaster Recovery plan, co-author of a Benefit Cost Analysis on policies to address seismic risk from unreinforced masonry buildings, and is working with the National Academy of Sciences' Resilient America Pilot Project in Seattle.

Patrick Otellini, City of San Francisco

Title: Chief Resilience Officer
Author bio: Patrick Otellini is the newly appointed Chief Resilience Officer (CRO) for the City and County of San Francisco tasked with developing the city's resiliency strategy in conjunction with the 100 Resilient Cities initiative pioneered by the Rockefeller Foundation. Mr. Otellini was originally appointed by Mayor Ed Lee in October of 2012 as the Director of San Francisco's Earthquake Safety Implementation Program. This public policy driven group has recently passed unanimously approved pieces of legislation that range from mandatory retrofits of soft story building to post-earthquake repair standards with the goal of making San Francisco more resilient in the face of disaster. Prior to his appointment Mr. Otellini was a Senior Associate with A.R. Sanchez-Corea & Associates, San Francisco's premier permit and code consulting firm. His work there included the management of the permit and inspection process for over $2 Billion worth of construction in San Francisco. He Is a Certified Building Inspector through the International Code Council (ICC) and a Certified Fire Protection Specialist through the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA). Patrick lives in San Francisco with his wife and two children. He received his Bachelor's Degree from Westmont College in Political Science.

Chris D. Poland, Haselton Baker Risk Group

Author bio: Curt B. Haselton, Ph.D., P.E., Professor and Chair in Civil Engineering at California State University, Chico, and Co-Founder of the Seismic Performance Prediction Program (SP3) and Haselton Baker Risk Group (hbrisk.com). Dr. Haselton's research is in the area of performance-based earthquake engineering, with focuses on building code development, collapse safety assessment, ground motion selection and scaling, damage and loss estimation, and the treatment of uncertainties. Dr. Haselton was recently the chair of the Building Seismic Safety Council team to rewriting Chapter 16 of ASCE 7.
Abstract: This presentation covers the FEMA P-58 methodology and the newly-available Seismic Performance Prediction Program (SP3) commercial software to implement this methodology. FEMA P-58 is a rigorous method of seismic evaluation, based on a $12M 10-year FEMA project, which provides detailed estimates of building repair cost, repair time, and safety. The SP3 software is a commercial implementation of FEMA P-58, with the goal of making broad use of FEMA P-58 feasible in engineering practice. SP3 puts all of the components of a FEMA P-58 analysis into one place, and streamlines each step, making this analysis feasible in hours rather than days or weeks. The recent emergence of the U.S. Resiliency Council rating system will also be discussed, along with the related Resilience Based Design Initiative (REDi) method, which both build on the FEMA P-58 loss prediction method.

Curt B. Haselton, Haselton Baker Risk Group

Author bio: Curt B. Haselton, Ph.D., P.E., Professor and Chair in Civil Engineering at California State University, Chico, and Co-Founder of the Seismic Performance Prediction Program (SP3) and Haselton Baker Risk Group (hbrisk.com). Dr. Haselton's research is in the area of performance-based earthquake engineering, with focuses on building code development, collapse safety assessment, ground motion selection and scaling, damage and loss estimation, and the treatment of uncertainties. Dr. Haselton was recently the chair of the Building Seismic Safety Council team to rewriting Chapter 16 of ASCE 7.
Abstract: This presentation covers the FEMA P-58 methodology and the newly-available Seismic Performance Prediction Program (SP3) commercial software to implement this methodology. FEMA P-58 is a rigorous method of seismic evaluation, based on a $12M 10-year FEMA project, which provides detailed estimates of building repair cost, repair time, and safety. The SP3 software is a commercial implementation of FEMA P-58, with the goal of making broad use of FEMA P-58 feasible in engineering practice. SP3 puts all of the components of a FEMA P-58 analysis into one place, and streamlines each step, making this analysis feasible in hours rather than days or weeks. The recent emergence of the U.S. Resiliency Council rating system will also be discussed, along with the related Resilience Based Design Initiative (REDi) method, which both build on the FEMA P-58 loss prediction method.

Anna Lang, Rochester Institute of Technology

Author bio: Dr. Anna Lang is an internationally recognized earthquake engineer now working to apply remote sensing technologies for disaster prediction and response. Anna has dedicated her career to addressing seismic design concerns in developing countries and is recognized for her research on confined masonry. She recently received the prestigious Intelligence Community Postdoctoral Fellowship Award from the Central Intelligence Agency. Anna is currently working on automating building inventory collection and creating three-dimensional visualizations of the built environment from remote sensing imagery. You can find out more about her work and get in touch at https://www.linkedin.com/in/annalang1. Anna lives with her husband and two children in Rochester, New York, where they eagerly await the end of her husband's medical residency. She longs for past days of professional bike racing and personal freedom, but rides along the Erie Canal with the kids are fun too. Anna recently bought a minivan.
Abstract: Global communities are entering a new, devastating age of vulnerability to natural disasters. Skyrocketing populations, uncontrolled urbanization, and severe weather from climate change are making "mega-disasters" a more common occurrence, with the majority of losses occurring in developing countries. Although we possess the technology to curb the impacts from these events, we have far to go to efficiently assess community risk and disseminate that knowledge to decision-makers and citizens in an effective and intuitive manner. The Digital Imaging and Remote Sensing (DIRS) group at the Rochester Institute of Technology is working to address these challenges by utilizing the latest advancements in remote sensing and image processing. Dr. Lang will provide an overview of these technologies and discuss her work to develop a rapid and automated means to collect building inventories and visualize hazard exposure in three dimensions. Researchers at DIRS have pioneered the ability to reconstruct three-dimensional geometric data from satellite and aerial imagery sources. This advancement allows us to generate individual building models and display them on an accessible and navigable platform such as Google Earth. This procedure serves as the backbone of a broader computational framework to capture and aggregate individual building characteristics, including elevation, footprint, and even construction material type. An overview of this procedure will be presented, along with an exploration of demonstration sites in Rochester, New York, and Port-au-Prince, Haiti. Implementation of this effort draws together the latest advancements in remote sensing and image processing technologies and increasing global access to the internet. Satellite and aerial imagery can be obtained anywhere of interest with minimal lead times. The growing use and availability of unmanned aerial systems is likewise expanding collection capabilities with decreasing cost and time. Additionally, today's image processing capabilities offer a vastly improved and efficient method for cataloging and querying the built environment. Resolution capabilities of commercial satellites are now 30 cm planar and 15 cm elevation, with even greater resolution from aerial sensors. And at an ever-increasing rate, isolated and impoverished communities around the world are gaining internet access and joining the global community. We are at a pivotal time to take advantage of these technologies, integrate them into the risk modeling community, and utilize them to assess, visualize, and communicate natural hazard risk to global communities.

Ross S. Stein, Temblor.net

Author bio: Ross S. Stein is CEO and cofounder of Temblor.net, Consulting Professor of Geophysics at Stanford University, Scientist Emeritus at the U.S. Geological Survey, and President-Elect of the Tectonophysics section of the American Geophysical Union (AGU). He is a Fellow of the AGU and the Geological Society of America, was Editor of the Journal of Geophysical Research, and later chaired AGU's Board of Journal Editors. Stein received the 2012 Gilbert F. White Natural Hazards Award from AGU, gave a 2012 TEDx talk, "Defeating Earthquakes," and received the 2000 Eugene M. Shoemaker Distinguished Achievement Award of the USGS. In 2003, the Science Citation Index reported that Stein was the second most cited author in earthquake science during the preceding decade; he was tenth most cited during 1900-2010. In 2009, he cofounded the Global Earthquake Model, a public-private partnership building a seismic risk model for the world. Ross chaired GEM's Science Board through 2014. Stein is a member of the Resilient America Roundtable of the National Academy of Sciences, and the Natural Catastrophe Advisory Council of Zurich Insurance.
Abstract: I will give a live demo of Temblor, a mobile-friendly web app. Temblor uses the best available public data and methods to make seismic risk personal, understandable, and actionable. Temblor is not trying to scare, soothe, or snow people, but rather to let people understand their seismic risk and compare it to other risks they protect themselves against. The app is ad free, free for non-commercial use, and it works throughout the lower 48. Temblor gives you the seismic hazard rank of your location anywhere in the United States. In its map, you can see the faults, quakes, landslides, and liquefaction zones around you. Today's quakes are red; the past month's quakes are green. You can click on quakes or faults to learn more. Given your home's construction year and square footage, you learn the likely cost for seismic damage, and how that cost could be reduced by retrofit, or the chances it would covered by insurance. In the Temblor blog (blog.temblor.net), we notify you about the latest quakes, provide insights, and post editorials about seismic safety and discoveries.

Ahmad Wani, One Concern

Author bio: Ahmad Wani serves as the CEO and Co-Founder of One Concern. He holds a graduate degree in Structural Engineering from Stanford University's School of Engineering. In January 2016, Mr. Wani was named by the Forbes magazine as one of the world's top thirty innovators, in its Forbes 30 under 30 edition, for his work in this field. Before coming to Stanford, Mr. Wani performed structural design and risk analysis for power plants for the Central Government of India.
Abstract: Achieving rapid situational awareness following a natural disaster is a challenge for every emergency operation center. Past events have shown that the current practices of responding to 911 calls on first-come-first-serve basis, relying on social networks, and waiting for manual reports, do not adequately address this issue. Infact, most communication channels are stressed following a natural disaster and the most damaged areas have the greatest difficulty reaching out for help. One Concern empowers emergency managers achieve situational awareness after an earthquake using artificial intelligence on natural phenomena sciences.

Jeffrey Berman, University of Washington

Author bio: Jeffrey Berman, is an Associate Professor at the University of Washington in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and the Director of the UW Structural Research Laboratory. He received his Ph.D. from the University at Buffalo and joined the UW in 2006. His research is focused on the seismic behavior of buildings and bridges, including the implementation of new technologies for improving performance. He received the 2005 J. James Croes Award from ASCE and the 2008 Milek Fellowship from AISC.
Abstract: The M9 Project is a National Science Foundation supported research effort at the University of Washington to better understand the Pacific Northwest's (PNW) seismic risk to Magnitude 9 Cascadia Subduction Zone (CSZ) earthquakes and subsequent tsunamis and landslides, and to improve planning and resilience by exploring the benefits of an earthquake early warning system and novel methods of risk communication to stakeholders and the public. This four year effort is built around a large-scale computational model of the PNW that is used to simulate ground motions time histories for a broad range of large magnitude CSZ rupture scenarios and includes detailed modeling of the geological basins that are underneath Seattle, Everett, Tacoma, and Portland. The spatially distributed simulated ground motions are being used to: (i) investigate response of typical structures in the region, (ii) inform input for computational tsunami models to predict run-up depths, velocities and forces on coastal structures, (iii) predict the regional distribution of landslides, (iv) investigate the liquefaction potential around the region, and (v) to test newly developed earthquake early warning systems. The current and future results of this ongoing research are then being used in community planning exercises that explore aspects of risk communication and perception. At the 2016 EERI Annual Meeting, co-PI Jeffrey Berman will present an overview of the ongoing research project. The presentation will focus on the simulation of CSZ ground motions, their impacts on structural systems, and the modeling of CSZ generated tsunamis and their impacts on structures. More information on the M9 Project is available at: http://m9.ess.washington.edu

William Lehman, Hydrologic Engineering Center

Author bio: William Lehman is the lead developer of the Hydrologic Engineering Center's - Flood Impact Analysis (HEC-FIA) software package. He is an economist at the Hydrologic Engineering Center. He earned a BA in Mathematics (2006), a BA in Economics (2006), and a MS in Economics (2008), all from Oklahoma State University. William's experience has been in the field of life loss estimation for Dam and Levee Safety, as well as supporting Other Social Effects (OSE) for planning studies. Prior to working for the Hydrologic Engineering Center Mr. Lehman was an economist in the planning division at Little Rock District.

Keith Porter, SPA Risk LLC

Author bio: Dr. Porter is a Research Professor at the University of Colorado Boulder and Principal of the international risk consultancy SPA Risk LLC. He specializes in societal risk from natural disasters, seismic vulnerability of buildings, and 2nd generation performance-based earthquake engineering (PBEE-2). Notable works include the Mitigation Saves 4:1 benefit-cost ratio study, FEMA P-58 guidelines for PBEE-2, USGS's ShakeOut, ARkStorm, Tsunami Scenario, and HayWired scenarios, the Global Earthquake Model's vulnerability methodologies, and the Community Action Plan for Seismic Safety. He is a licensed Professional Engineer and author of 150 scholarly and professional works.
Abstract: Damage to water supply systems profoundly affects society after earthquakes. Consequently, for several decades, researchers have developed water-supply loss models that address damage from earthquake shaking, liquefaction, fault offset, and landslide. A new stochastic simulation model is offered here that employs a fairly traditional loss-estimation approach, adding a few notable features: (1) It deals with the entire earthquake sequence, i.e., damage and recovery after the earthquake mainshock, aftershocks, and because of afterslip. (2) It offers an empirical model of service restoration with simplifications to avoid hydraulic analysis. (3) It addresses lifeline interaction by modeling how individual repairs are slowed by limitations in so-called upstream lifelines and other resources. The model is exercised on two Bay Area water supply systems subjected to the hypothetical but highly realistic HayWired earthquake sequence: a M 7.05 mainshock on the Hayward Fault in the eastern San Francisco Bay Area, plus 16 aftershocks of M 5 or greater. The model is validated several ways for each of the case-study systems. One utility anticipates using it to target vulnerable segments of its system for accelerated pipe replacement.

Mark N. White, Law Offices of Mark N. White

Author bio: Mark N. White is a Berkeley-based attorney who advises institutional clients on managing seismic risk in the legal arena. Mark practiced as a litigation partner at Pillsbury Winthrop Shaw Pittman LLC (formerly Pillsbury Madison & Sutro) for 25 years and has managed seismic risk challenges for clients throughout the West Coast and the Pacific since 1982. His website is http://www.markwhitelaw.com and he can be reached at mark.white@mnwhitelaw.com.

Joel B. Castro, Castro & Associates

Author bio: Joel Castro heads Castro & Associates, an AV-rated firm of construction trial attorneys specializing in complex multiparty litigation. He won a multimillion-dollar recovery for the 16 death and injury cases during the Northridge earthquake and won the first California death cases from the collapse of a URM building in the San Simeon earthquake. He won a $23 million jury verdict in the Monterey Hills land subsidence case. The firm handles complex seismic structures, transit-oriented developments, residential, commercial and industrial cases. Mr. Castro was honored with the Los Angeles County Bar Association's "Outstanding Construction Attorney Award" for 2015 and is a Top Rated Lawyer, a Super Lawyer, and a Multi-Million Dollar Attorney. Mr. Castro was featured in National Geographic magazine, National Geographic Channel's "Anatomy of an Earthquake" and in Forbes Magazine.
Abstract: Unreinforced masonry (URM) and soft story buildings have been responsible for deaths and property damage in California in the past and will continue to do so in future earthquakes. As California awaits its next major earthquake, a renewed focus on retrofitting hazardous buildings statewide is occurring. What does an owner do when he is notified that he owns a "hazardous building" and should retrofit it to abate the dangerous condition, but financial restraints preclude retrofit action? What happens when a foreseeable event (earthquake, flood or hurricane) triggers the collapse of such buildings with resultant death and injury? Was the death or injury preventable but for the the owner's failure to act reasonably in the face of a known risk? We will address these issues under California law and the recent Myrick v. Mastagni case.

Abby Rubinson, EarthJustice

Author bio: Abby Rubinson is a consultant on international, environmental, and human rights law and has taught International Environmental Law as an adjunct professor at the University of San Francisco School of Law. As an attorney in the International Program of Earthjustice from 2010 to 2015, she submitted briefs and formal communications to the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights, U.S. federal courts, and United Nations treaty bodies and special rapporteurs on international environmental issues. Prior to that, she was one of plaintiffs' counsel in three international human rights cases brought under the Alien Tort Statute, Bowoto v. Chevron and Wiwa v. Shell, both related to oil operations in Nigeria, and In re South African Apartheid Litigation, related to apartheid-era abuses in South Africa. She also worked with Human Rights Watch as a post-graduate fellow and consultant, based primarily in Brazil. She received her B.A. from Duke University and J.D. from University of Michigan Law School.
Abstract: I will present on the environmental movement's use of legal action to drive social change, with a view to where the earthquake community might be able to build on some of those successes and learn from some of the challenges. First, I will give background as to how legal action has become a useful tool for the environmental movement. I will briefly explain various approaches environmental advocates have taken toward goals such as better environmental protection in the form of environmental standards, and I will show where legal action can be particularly useful in achieving those goals. I will also describe some of the downsides of pursuing legal action, as well as where legal action may not be the most effective strategy in pursuing environmental protection, so that participants develop an understanding of the pros and cons of a legal approach. Next, I will present examples of successful uses of legal action to promote environmental objectives, highlighting elements that likely contributed to those successes. I will also note some of the challenges, again, so that participants can get a better sense of when the law may be a useful strategy for them. Finally, I will draw links between the characteristics behind successful legal action in the environmental context and potentially favorable characteristics for legal action by the earthquake community. The aim is for the participants (i) to understand when legal action is a particularly promising strategy; and (ii) to be able to apply that understanding to the objectives they are pursuing in the earthquake context.

René Vignos, Forell/Elsesser

Abstract: In many municipalities in California there are ordinances on the books that require building owners to retrofit or at least reduce seismic hazards in their buildings. While many owners will willingly fix their building once made aware of the hazard, there are still certain owners that will delay and avoid compliance by exploiting the over-worked bureaucracies' ability to enforce these laws. Legal action against such building owners is a great way to root out those owners who shirk their responsibility and thereby endanger members of the public with their decisions. The threat of legal action may also be a great way to compel more municipalities to add laws to their books to deal with the most seismically hazardous buildings in their communities. But, as often seen with other attempts to force certain societal behaviors through threat of lawsuits, the more powerful methods of social change can often come through education and social pressure. There are several innovative approaches being used or developed in seismic areas around the world that could have powerful effects in calling attention to seismic hazards including: educating municipalities on the effects of past earthquakes, municipalities requiring evaluations where requiring retrofit is politically difficult, educating the insurance industry seismic hazards to compel retrofits as a requirement of getting insurance coverage, educate the public through the media to publicize known seismic risks in our cities so that pressure can come from an informed citizenry, educate owners on their legal exposure given the current legal judgements recently made in California, engage local engineering organizations to donate services to low income owners who want to understand and deal with seismic risks (but don't have the resources to do so).
Author bio: René Vignos is a Principal with Forell/Elsesser Engineers in San Francisco and a licensed structural engineer in California, Utah, Wyoming, and Oregon with over 20 years of experience in the seismic design of new buildings and the evaluation, restoration and retrofit of historic and non-historic structures. Mr. Vignos is currently leading the design of some new buildings on the Facebook campus and in the past has worked on several retrofits including the Utah State Capitol and California Memorial Stadium at UC Berkeley. Mr. Vignos is also a member of the San Francisco Code Advisory Committee.

Rebekah Paci-Green, Western Washington University

Author bio: Dr. Rebekah Paci-Green is an assistant professor of Environmental Studies at Western Washington University where she teaches courses in natural hazards planning and disaster risk reduction. She is also Director of the Resilience Institute, where she oversees projects aimed at reducing disasters and enhancing community resilience. She has worked with countries across Asia to ensure school safety and worked with communities in the United States to reduce vulnerability and recover from disasters.

Brian Tucker, GeoHazards International

Author bio: Brian Tucker received a B.A. in Physics from Pomona College, a Ph.D. in Earth Sciences from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California, San Diego and a Masters in Public Policy from Harvard University. He headed the Geologic Hazards Programs of the California Geological Survey from 1982 to 1991. In 1991, he founded GeoHazards International, a nonprofit organization working to reduce the risk of natural hazards in the world's most vulnerable communities through preparedness, mitigation and advocacy.

Carlos Ventura, University of British Columbia

Author bio: Carlos Ventura is a Civil Engineer with specializations in structural dynamics and earthquake engineering. He has been a faculty member of the Department of Civil Engineering at the University of British Columbia (UBC) in Canada since 1992. He is currently the Director of the Earthquake Engineering Research Facility (EERF) at UBC, and is the author of more than 450 papers and reports on earthquake engineering, structural dynamics and modal testing. Dr. Ventura has conducted research about earthquakes and structural dynamics for more than thirty years. In addition to his academic activities, Dr. Ventura is a recognized international consultant on structural vibrations and safety of large Civil Engineering structures. He is a member of the Canadian Academy of Engineering and of the Engineering Institute of Canada, and Fellow of Engineers Canada. He is also a member of several national and international professional societies, advisory committees and several building and bridge code committees.

Yumei Wang, DOGAMI

Author bio: Yumei Wang is a civil/geohazards engineer at the Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI). She has since 1994 focused on building resilience to natural hazards. She currently serves on the National Academies liquefaction committee, has been an advisor to the National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program (NEHRP), to the 2013 FEMA-funded tsunami methodology development project and to the 2013 Oregon Resilience Plan, and has taken part in post-earthquake damage assessments including the 2011 Tohoku, Japan and 2010 Maule, Chile disasters. Wang has been a guest on PBS NewsHour, been interviewed by The New York Times, and appeared in documentaries produced by NOVA, National Geographic, and Discovery. Wang served as a Congressional Fellow in the U.S. Senate in Washington DC, and worked as a geotechnical consultant in California, including on the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake. She is on the Board of the Cascadia Region Earthquake Workgroup and is currently working for the Chief Financial Office at Department of Administrative Services (DAS CFO) on building resilience from the impacts of natural disasters.

Barry Welliver, BHW Engineers

Author bio: Barry H. Welliver has been involved in structural engineering since 1973. In California he worked for several prominent firms before establishing his own private practice in 1979. After twenty two years of residency, he moved with his family to Utah where he presently has a practice while maintaining his California office. He has been actively involved in the Structural Engineers Associations of Northern California and Utah, the Utah Seismic Safety Commission and the Earthquake Engineering Research Institute. He is currently chair of the School Earthquake Safety Initiative committee of EERI and has been a member of several Applied Technology Council projects including FEMA 154 3rd edition updates, FEMA 420 Engineering Guidelines for Incremental Seismic Rehabilitation and FEMA/ATC-122 School Hazard Safety Guide.

Marko Schotanus, Rutherford + Chekene

Author bio: Marko is a structural engineer at Rutherford + Chekene in San Francisco. His experience includes advanced structural analysis, seismic evaluation and retrofit of existing buildings, seismic peer review, and new building design. Marko is a past chair and active participant in both SEAOC and SEAONC Existing Building Committees and subcommittees where he has participated in the development of various commentaries, standards and codes for the evaluation and retrofit of existing buildings. He was actively involved in reconnaissance following the 2014 South Napa Earthquake, the 2011 Christchurch Earthquake in New Zealand, the 2009 L'Aquila Earthquake in Italy, and is a Cal EMA certified Safety Assessment Program trainer. Marko served as the EERI Reconnaissance Team Leader for the South Napa Earthquake.

David Lallemant, Stanford University

Author bio: David Lallemant completed his PhD from Stanford University in 2015. His research focuses on understanding and quantifying the evolution of extreme risk in today's growing cities. He uses hazard modeling, engineering analysis, urban analytics, predictive modeling and spatial statistics for application in large-scale natural disaster risk analysis. The transdisciplinary and policy-oriented nature of his work has led him to build collaborations with the World Bank, Google, the Red Cross, the Global Facility for Disaster Reduction and Recovery and others. He holds a master's degree from UC Berkeley (2010) and bachelor's degree from MIT (2007). David is also active in post-disaster response and recovery, which forms the basis for his research on post-disaster assessment and community resilience. He worked for two years in Haiti following the 2010 earthquake and has been involved with the response and recovery following the 2015 earthquake in Nepal.

Surya Shrestha, NSET

Author bio: Mr. Surya Narayan Shrestha has a masters in Structural Engineering from the Institute of Engineering, Tribhuvan University and receiving a PhD from Tribhuvan University in Nepal with research in University of Basilicata in Italy. Mr. Shrestha works as Deputy Executive Director of National Society for Earthquake Technology (NSET), Nepal. As a structural engineer and risk reduction specialist Mr. Shrestha has worked as a team leader of several programs implemented by NSET. Mr. Shrestha has more than 15 years experience in Earthquake Risk Reduction in Nepal and the region. As a Deputy Executive Director, his major responsibilities are to provide regular guidance and monitor senior professionals of NSET for the implementation of its activities and operations of NSET.

Maryann Phipps

Author bio: Maryann is a practicing Structural Engineer with over 30 years experience evaluating, designing and renovating facilities to remain operational after earthquakes. Hands-on experience designing hospitals, schools and laboratories for post-earthquake functionality has helped make Maryann a recognized expert in the seismic protection of nonstructural components. She was the lead technical consultant for FEMA P-74 Reducing the Risks of Nonstructural Earthquake Damage, and she is currently leading ATC-120, a NIST-sponsored project entitled Seismic Analysis and Design of Nonstructural Components and Systems, intended to advance the state of practice in this field. She was co-technical lead for FEMA P-1024, Performance of Buildings and Nonstructural Components in the 2014 South Napa Earthquake. Maryann is President of Estructure, a San Francisco Bay Area structural engineering firm, and a Past President and Fellow of the Structural Engineers Association of California.

Charles Huyck, ImageCat

Author bio: As a founding partner of ImageCat, Mr. Huyck develops the operational strategies for spatial technologies. He directs a team of engineers, scientists, and programmers developing software tools and data processing algorithms for loss estimation and risk assessment. He has over 20 years of experience integrating advanced geospatial technologies into CAT modeling programs. Recent interests include business interruption, heuristics for data cleaning, and crowd-sourced damage detection using remotely-sensed data.

David Friedman, Forell/Elsesser

Author bio: David is a Senior Principal, and emeritus President, CEO and Board Chair of Forell/Elsesser Engineers Inc., with over 40 years of professional practice (35 years at F/E!) in structural and earthquake engineering. His strength, gained over the breadth and depth of his career, is a holistic perspective of a projects’ planning, design and construction and the collaborative integration of creative structural solutions with architects, engineers and builders. With a specialty in seismic engineering and retrofitting of existing structures, particularly those with historic designation, David has solved numerous structural and earthquake engineering challenges during his career with Forell/Elsesser Engineers. Principal examples of his projects include the base isolation retrofits of San Francisco City Hall and the Asian Art Museum, the adaptive reuse and retrofit for the San Francisco Conservatory of Music, and the seismic safety corrections and remodeling of UC Berkeley’s California Memorial Stadium. David is devoted to world-wide seismic risk reduction and is a former director of the Earthquake Engineering Research Institute, and a current director of Build Change. He is also deeply involved in many other civic, philanthropic and not-for-profit Boards including The San Francisco Foundation, SPUR, UC Berkeley Foundation, Jewish Senior Living Group, Faultline Foundation and the United States Resiliency Council (USRC).

Kathleen Tierney, National Hazards Center

Author bio: Kathleen Tierney is a professor in the Department of Sociology and the Institute of Behavioral Science and director of the Natural Hazards Center at the University of Colorado Boulder. Kathleen's research focuses on the societal dimensions of hazards, disasters, and risk, and her current research interests include the political economy of disasters and hazard risk reduction, community resilience, and post-disaster business and economic resilience. She is a former distinguished lecturer, board member, and vice president of EERI. Kathleen most recent book, The Social Roots of Risk: Producing Disasters, Promoting Resilience, was published in June 2014 by Stanford University Press.

Rebekah Paci-Green, Western Washington University

Author bio: Dr. Rebekah Paci-Green is an assistant professor of Environmental Studies at Western Washington University where she teaches courses in natural hazards planning and disaster risk reduction. She is also Director of the Resilience Institute, where she oversees projects aimed at reducing disasters and enhancing community resilience. She has worked with countries across Asia to ensure school safety and worked with communities in the United States to reduce vulnerability and recover from disasters.

Sjoerd van Ballogooy, Tonkin + Taylor Ltd.

Author bio: Sjoerd van Ballegooy is a senior geotechnical engineer and technical director at Tonkin + Taylor Ltd, a specialist geotechnical consultancy company in New Zealand. He received his undergraduate and graduate degrees from the University of Auckland, New Zealand. Since September 2010, Sjoerd has been involved in leading the geotechnical response to the damage caused by the 2010 - 2016 Canterbury earthquake sequence and in 2013 received the Queen's Service Order, Honorary Companion for his services to geotechnical science. His main roles involved overseeing the mapping of the land damage and building damage and the ground surface subsidence, helping the New Zealand Government in evaluate which land would be suitable for rebuilding and the New Zealand Earthquake Commission understand its land liabilities and identify which land is vulnerable to liquefaction and where the vulnerability has increased as a result of the physical changes caused by the earthquake sequence. Sjoerd has also architected the online geotechnical database system to manage, gather and disseminate the land damage data and geotechnical investigation data to the wider engineering community as well as lead a large ground improvement trial programme to evaluate the effectiveness of different ground improvement methods to enable the residential areas of Christchurch to be rebuilt with greater resilience to future damage using affordable solutions.
Abstract: The 2010-2016 Canterbury Earthquake Sequence (CES) affected the Canterbury region of New Zealand resulting in widespread ground surface deformation, mainly due to liquefaction ejecta, liquefaction related volumetric densification of soils, topographic relevelling and lateral spreading, causing extensive land, infrastructure and building damage. The liquefaction affected 51,000 residential properties and damaged approximately 15,000 residential houses beyond economic repair. The total economic losses from the CES were in the order of $40B, with approximately one third of the economic losses being directly attributable to liquefaction. This presentation will examine the lessons learnt from the liquefaction damage and present a case study for a consideration of how we build our residential houses to be affordable, resilient and more readily repairable, by better matching building typology to the natural hazards that have the potential to occur. Five years on from the CES, the repair and rebuild residential houses damaged by the 2010-2011 earthquakes was substantially underway. New houses have been rebuilt either on shallow ground improvements or more robust foundation systems. On 14 February 2016 a MW 5.7 earthquake occurred in Christchurch, once again triggering liquefaction in the eastern suburbs. Preliminary observations of the effects of liquefaction on the new residential house portfolio are presented including comparisons of how the houses on shallow ground improvements and more robust foundation systems performed relative to the houses constructed prior to the CES. This aftershock event provides an excellent case study to evaluate the benefits of improving building resiliency.

Youssef Hashash, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Author bio: Youssef Hashash, Ph.D., P.E is the William J. and Elaine F. Hall professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He received his undergraduate and graduate degrees from MIT after which he worked in Dallas, Texas and San Francisco, California on a number of underground construction projects in the U.S. and Canada. Youssef joined the faculty of the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 1998. He taught courses in Geotechnical Engineering, Numerical Modeling in Geomechanics, Geotechnical Earthquake Engineering, Tunneling in Soil and Rock, and Excavation Support Systems. His research focus includes deep excavations in urban areas, earthquake engineering, continuum and discrete element modeling and soil-structure interaction. He also works on geotechnical engineering applications of visualization, augmented reality, imaging and drone technologies. He has published over 200 articles and is co-inventor on four patents. His research group developed the software program DEEPSOIL that is used worldwide for evaluation of soil response to earthquake shaking.
Abstract: Underground structures are a key component of sustainable cities. In dense urban environments, underground structures are often built near tall buildings. Although such buildings have the potential to alter ground motions in their vicinity and transmit significant forces to adjacent underground structures during earthquakes, these impacts are not well understood. This presentation will describe a research program that includes centrifuge experiments and numerical analyses aimed at understanding the seismic performance of a braced excavation and a permanent box structure buried in medium dense, dry sand. The response of these underground structures is first studied in isolation, then, a model midrise and a high-rise building are added near the underground structures to evaluate their influence. Preliminary experimental results indicate that the presence of an adjacent high-rise building slightly reduces racking displacements on the buried structure, but increases seismic lateral earth pressures on the building side of the buried structure and the response can be captured using three-dimensional models. This enhanced understanding of the interaction of these structures is important to improving the resiliency of our urban infrastructure.

Ellen Rathje, University of Texas at Austin

Author bio: Dr. Ellen M. Rathje is the Warren S. Bellows Centennial Professor in the Department of Civil, Architectural, and Environmental Engineering at the University of Texas at Austin. She has expertise in the areas of seismic site response analysis, seismic slope stability, field reconnaissance after earthquakes, and remote sensing of geotechnical phenomena. She has published over 150 papers on these topics and has supervised the research of over 30 graduate students. Dr. Rathje is a founding member and current Co-Chair of the Geotechnical Extreme Events Reconnaissance (GEER) Association and she was a member of the Board of Directors of the Earthquake Engineering Research Institute (EERI) from 2010-2013. She is the Principal Investigator for the DesignSafe-ci.org cyberinfrastructure for the NSF-funded Natural Hazards Engineering Research Infrastructure (NHERI). She has been honored with various research awards, including the Huber Research Prize from the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) in 2010, the Hogentogler Award for outstanding paper from ASTM Committee D18 in 2010, the Shamsher Prakash Research Award in 2007, and the Shah Innovation Prize from EERI in 2006.
Abstract: One dimensional site response analysis is one of the most commonly used numerical techniques in geotechnical earthquake engineering. Borehole arrays, where earthquake recordings are made at depth as well as the ground surface, provide invaluable data that can be used to assess the numerical techniques used for site response analysis. Borehole array recordings in the US and Japan are used to evaluate equivalent linear (EQL) analysis, equivalent linear analysis with frequency-dependent soil properties (EQL-FD), and fully nonlinear analysis (NL). The required damping to fit the small-strain response is shown to be larger than predicted by typical material damping curves derived from laboratory tests. At peak shear strains less than about 0.1%, all three site response techniques accurately predict site amplification relative to the borehole arrays. At peak shear strains larger than 0.1% and at periods less than about 0.4 s, EQL and NL analyses under-predict site amplification and EQL-FD analyses over-predict site amplification. Consideration of the shear strength of the soil when specifying the modulus reduction curve only slightly improves these comparisons. Additional research is needed to develop appropriate techniques to model large strain site response at periods less than 0.4 s.

Jonathan D. Bray, UC Berkeley

Author bio: Jonathan Bray is the Faculty Chair in Earthquake Engineering Excellence at the University of California, Berkeley. He earned engineering degrees from West Point, Stanford, and Berkeley. Dr. Bray is a registered professional civil engineer and has served as a consultant on several important engineering projects and peer review panels. He has authored more than 300 research publications on topics that include liquefaction and its effects on structures, seismic performance of earth structures, earthquake ground motions, and earthquake fault rupture propagation. He leads the Geotechnical Extreme Events Reconnaissance (GEER) Association. Dr. Bray is a member of the US National Academy of Engineering and has received several honors, including the Peck Award, Joyner Lecture, Huber Research Prize, Packard Foundation Fellowship, and NSF Presidential Young Investigator Award.
Abstract: Several multi-story office buildings settled differentially and were damaged as a result of soil liquefaction during the 2011 Christchurch earthquake. The state-of-the practice still largely involves estimating building settlement using empirical procedures developed to calculate post-liquefaction, one-dimensional, consolidation settlement in the free-field away from buildings. Performance-based earthquake engineering requires improved procedures, because these free-field analyses cannot possibly capture shear-induced deformations in the soil beneath shallow foundations. Well-documented field case histories of office building performance in the Central Business District of Christchurch provide excellent benchmarks. Differential settlement of shallow-founded structures is often governed by liquefaction of shallow soils and the loss of ground due to the development of sediment ejecta. Shear strains due to shaking-induced ratcheting of buildings into cyclically softened soil are important effects that are not captured in current procedures. Dynamic SSI analysis can be used to evaluate building performance. Recommendations for estimating liquefaction-induced movements of buildings with shallow foundations are made.

Laurie A. Johnson, Laurie A. Johnson Consulting | Research

Author bio: Laurie Johnson is an urban planner specializing in disaster recovery and catastrophe risk management. She has been active in research and consulting on recovery planning and management following many of the world's major urban disasters, including the Loma Prieta and Northridge earthquakes, the Kobe and Tohoku Japan earthquakes, Hurricane Katrina, and Canterbury New Zealand earthquake sequence. She is a member of U.S. Geological Survey's Science Application for Risk Reduction (SAFRR) team focusing on long-term recovery and policy issues arising from the HayWired scenario of a M7.05 earthquake striking on the San Francisco Bay Area's Hayward fault in April 2018. Dr. Johnson is also a visiting project scientist at the Pacific Earthquake Engineering Research Center (PEER) at the University of California-Berkeley, chairs the U.S. National Advisory Committee for Earthquake Hazards Reduction, and serves on the steering committee of GEER - the Geotechnical Extreme Event Reconnaissance organization and the board of directors of SPUR -the San Francisco Bay Area's civic and good governance organization. She is a long-standing member of the Earthquake Engineering Research Institute, American Institute of Certified Planners, and American Planning Association. She holds a Doctor of Informatics degree from Kyoto University, Japan and a Master of Urban Planning and Bachelor of Science in Geophysics, both from Texas A&M University.
Abstract: A major challenge that communities face in assessing and measuring resilience involves interdependent lifeline systems. Currently lifeline system performance standards and goals are governed by a myriad of codes, standards, and guidelines for the design, construction and operation of individual systems and system components. Recently the National Institute of Science and Technology (NIST) has sponsored two projects to help address this problem. The first, Earthquake-Resilient Lifelines: NEHRP Research, Development and Implementation Roadmap (NIST GCR 14-917-33) (NEHRP Consultants Joint Venture 2014), developed a four-point program with 28 priority research, development and implementation topics to guide investments by NIST and other federal agencies in generating national performance goals for six key lifeline systems (e.g., electric power, gas and liquid fuel, water, wastewater, telecommunications and transportation) in concert with the development of needed codes, standards, guidelines, and manuals for key systems and components, and a coherent and well-coordinated plan to promote their voluntary adoption by communities and lifeline providers. The second, being conducted by the Applied Technology Council, is implementing one of the priority recommendations in the NIST Earthquake-Resilient Lifelines roadmap, to assess societal expectations of acceptable lifeline performance levels and restoration times with an expansion to consider seismic (including tsunami) as well as wind, flood, snow/ice and wildfire hazards. Ultimately, this project seeks to provide a technical foundation for first-generation systems-based models that will analyze community resilience and account for interdependencies among infrastructure systems and the social systems that they support. Conceptual thinking about resilience measurement also needs to consider the moment of resilience and whether resilience actions and interventions occur before or after the disaster onset. Frameworks like the Rockefeller Foundation and Arup, Community Resilience Framework (2014), the NIST Community Resilience Planning Guide for Building and Infrastructure Systems (2015), and the SPUR "Target States of Recovery for San Francisco Buildings and Infrastructure" (2009) have been primarily designed for and used in pre-disaster resilience planning, helping communities to craft a resilience vision and then to identify and prioritize actions or interventions leading to resilience ahead of disaster. By their very nature, disasters cause a simultaneous loss of capital across multiple societal systems putting them in a hyper-interdependent state. To be useful, post-disaster resilience measurements have to be conducted systematically and sustained over time in order to understand the recovery and resilience trajectories of different societal systems and the interdependencies among systems. The Canterbury Wellbeing Index and the Canterbury Wellbeing Survey, designed and implemented by New Zealand's national government in the aftermath of the 2010-2011 earthquake sequence, offer useful insights into the conduct of post-disaster, community-scale, resilience assessments and their potential value in recovery and resilience policy design and implementation.

Alan Kwok, Massey University, Wellington, New Zealand

Author bio: Alan Kwok is currently conducting his doctoral research on social resilience measurements at the Joint Centre for Disaster Research at Massey University, Wellington, New Zealand. His research focuses on the social factors that influence neighborhood resilience in Wellington and San Francisco and how local communities can assess and cultivate pre-disaster social resilience. Prior to his research, Alan was manager of American Red Cross' Ready Neighborhoods, an innovative four-year initiative designed to increase community disaster resilience by building community preparedness and response capacities in 50 targeted neighborhoods throughout the San Francisco Bay Area Region. The initiative was awarded with the Federal Emergency Management Agency's 2012 Community Preparedness Award.
Abstract: As local communities begin to translate national and sub-national disaster resilience policies into practice, there is a growing need for governments and local stakeholder groups to identify resilience gaps and evaluate progress and investment strategies. Much of the existing research on resilience measurements assesses factors pertaining to a spectrum of societal domains, which includes social, economic, institutional, infrastructural, and natural environments. More recently, there is an increasing recognition on the importance of social resilience – the ability of groups or communities to cope with external disturbances – and how it contributes to community preparedness, disaster response and post-disaster recovery. However, despite a focus on social resilience by researchers and practitioners, there are tremendous variations in how social resilience is assessed. This presentation seeks to address the existing tools that measure social resilience, as well as the opportunities and challenges in evaluating programs that build resilience of the social environment at a community level. The first part of the presentation provides an overview of existing research and government efforts that assess community resilience in New Zealand. It reviews the Canterbury Wellbeing Survey that tracks recovery of post-earthquake Christchurch, resilience measurements in Auckland, as well as current tools that evaluate socioeconomic vulnerabilities and progress nationally. The second part of the presentation dives into how social resilience is defined and the key attributes that make communities socially resilient. It reports on the findings from a workshop that was conducted in late 2015 with academic researchers, emergency management practitioners from both public and private sectors, and policymakers from the government in the Wellington region. Although there are many facets to social resilience, a proposed core set of indicators is presented that serves as a foundation for understanding and measuring pre-disaster levels of social resilience of communities. The last part of the presentation bridges research and practice to identify ways forward. It discusses past and current efforts in New Zealand that increase social resilience of communities. It also highlights opportunities and challenges in developing metrics for assessing community resilience programs and tracking social resilience of people and communities.

Michael Mieler, Johns Hopkins University/University of CA, Berkeley

Author bio: Dr. Mieler is a Research Scientist with joint appointment at Johns Hopkins University and the University of California, Berkeley. His research focuses on characterizing the response of complex societal infrastructure systems to disturbances and stresses, including the development of novel tools and applications for communicating risk to decision makers, infrastructure operators, and other stakeholder groups. Currently, he is involved in a multi-institutional effort to develop an integrated model of a regional health care network to better understand the impact of natural hazards on the availability of critical health services following adverse events. Previously, he was a visiting researcher at GNS Science in New Zealand where he contributed to a diverse set of projects, including development of a web-based application for predicting seismic damage in near real time for the national rail operator and also a methodology for establishing a consistent hierarchy of performance objectives for a building and its myriad components. Dr. Mieler received his B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley in Civil and Environmental Engineering.
Abstract: The built environment, which includes buildings, lifeline systems, and other engineered structures, plays a vital role in the normal functioning of a community, both in day-to-day operations and in the aftermath of a major disaster. As recent earthquakes in Chile, New Zealand, and Japan have demonstrated, damage to the built environment can generate enormous societal impact, ranging from displacement of individual families and businesses to disruption of entire economic sectors and community services. Consequently, a significant component in the effort to mitigate these cascading impacts involves developing new frameworks, methodologies, and tools for assessing the resilience of the built environment at multiple scales, ranging from individual facilities (e.g., a hospital) to networks of buildings and lifeline systems that support critical community services (e.g., a regional healthcare network). This presentation describes several new frameworks, methodologies, and tools for assessing the resilience of the built environment at different scales. First, it discusses recent advances in quantifying the resilience of individual facilities. These new tools and models, which build upon traditional structural analysis methods for estimating forces and displacements, aim to predict damage and evaluate its impact on functionality, downtime, and the services the facility provides (e.g., emergency surgery at a hospital). These models account for not only structural and nonstructural damage, but also the availability of important utilities, supply chains, and personnel. Next, the presentation describes efforts to measure the resilience of networks of buildings and lifeline systems. These network models integrate components from various modeling domains to predict how failures and outages throughout the built environment impact a particular network’s ability to support an important community service (e.g., healthcare). Last, the presentation describes an ongoing initiative of the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) to develop resilience-based performance standards for the buildings and lifeline systems. The intent of these new standards is to connect resilience metrics and objectives across multiple scales of the built environment, thereby ensuring that individual buildings and lifeline systems are designed to perform in a manner that is compatible with community-level resilience goals.

Sharyl J. M. Rabinovici

Author bio: Sharyl Rabinovici received her Ph.D. in Public Policy from UC Berkeley with an emphasis on risk communication, disaster mitigation decision-making and behavior, and effective design and implementation of local mitigation programs. In 2014, she founded an independent consulting practice and has since completed survey and interview research, organizational strategy, and stakeholder engagement projects for a variety of entities involved in community resilience, including the California Earthquake Authority, the City of Palo Alto, and the Applied Technology Council. She was recently appointed as a Visiting Scholar at the Pacific Earthquake Engineering Research Center at Berkeley, currently serves on the Board of the US Resiliency Council, and is President-Elect for EERI's Northern California Chapter. Her background also includes two years as Visiting Assistant Professor of Public Policy at Mills College and five years with the US Geological Survey.

Arrietta Chakos, Urban Resilience Strategies

Author bio: Arrietta Chakos is a public policy advisor on urban resilience, working on community resilience strategies and multi-sectoral engagement. Her work as an advisor with the Association of Bay Area Governments focuses on resilience planning the S.F. Bay Area, emphasizing development of common resilience policies and implementation measures. The initiative, sponsored by the Federal Emergency Management Agency and the 100 Resilient Cities Initiative launched by the Rockefeller Foundation, engages communities to accelerate resilience action. Ms. Chakos is a member of the Resilience Roundtable and the Committee to Advise the U.S. Global Change Research Program at the National Academy of Sciences; she chairs the Housner Fellow committee at the Earthquake Engineering Research Institute. Ms. Chakos served as research director at the Harvard Kennedy School's Acting in Time Advance Recovery Project. She worked extensively in local government directing innovative risk mitigation initiatives, intergovernmental coordination, and multi-institutional negotiations at the City of Berkeley, California.

David Cocke, Structural Focus

Author bio: David Cocke, S.E., F. SEI, F. ASCE, founded Structural Focus in Los Angeles in 2001 after 20 years at a previous firm in California. He is a registered structural engineer in a dozen states and has an expertise in seismic evaluation, historic preservation, retrofit design and new structural design. Some of David’s more notable projects include the Annenberg Performing Arts Center in Beverly Hills, the Google Los Angeles headquarters, Red Bull North America headquarters, the Wilshire Boulevard Temple restoration in Los Angeles, multiple buildings at Dreamworks, Warner Bros. and Sony Pictures, and many others. David currently serves on the EERI Board of Directors, the SEI Board of Governors and has served on numerous Boards for the Structural Engineers Association in California, and on the Board of numerous preservation organizations. He is also the Managing Director of SAFEq Institute, an expert resource for building owners, risk managers, engineers, and local jurisdictions seeking to minimize facility and business interruption losses caused by disasters by establishing a program for first response post-disaster inspections.

Laura Samant

Author bio: Laura Samant helps communities to understand and reduce their risk from earthquakes. She has worked with communities worldwide—from San Francisco, California to Kathmandu, Nepal —currently as an independent consultant. Her key interest is translating state-of-the-art technical knowledge about disaster risk reduction into feasible and effective policies and programs that make cities safer. Recent accomplishments include serving as a co-project manager for the City of San Francisco’s influential Community Action Plan for Seismic Safety program, which led to the City’s soft story retrofit ordinance and the development of its Earthquake Safety Implementation Program, and chairing San Francisco’s Private School Earthquake Safety Working Group, which led to mandatory seismic evaluations of private school buildings in the City. Laura Samant serves on the board of GeoHazards International, a non-profit focused on reducing natural disaster risk in developing countries before disasters strike, and as the Chair of the Earthquake Engineering Research Institute’s Public Policy and Advocacy Committee.

Yumei Wang, DOGAMI

Author bio: Yumei Wang is a civil/geohazards engineer at the Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI). She has since 1994 focused on building resilience to natural hazards. She currently serves on the National Academies liquefaction committee, has been an advisor to the National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program (NEHRP), to the 2013 FEMA-funded tsunami methodology development project and to the 2013 Oregon Resilience Plan, and has taken part in post-earthquake damage assessments including the 2011 Tohoku, Japan and 2010 Maule, Chile disasters. Wang has been a guest on PBS NewsHour, been interviewed by The New York Times, and appeared in documentaries produced by NOVA, National Geographic, and Discovery. Wang served as a Congressional Fellow in the U.S. Senate in Washington DC, and worked as a geotechnical consultant in California, including on the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake. She is on the Board of the Cascadia Region Earthquake Workgroup and is currently working for the Chief Financial Office at Department of Administrative Services (DAS CFO) on building resilience from the impacts of natural disasters.

Thomas O'Rourke, Cornell University

Author bio: Tom O’Rourke is the Thomas R. Briggs Professor of Engineering in the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Cornell University. He is a member of the US National Academy of Engineering, Distinguished Member of ASCE, International Fellow of the Royal Academy of Engineering and a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He received a number of distinctions for his research and teaching, including from ASCE the Stephen D. Bechtel Pipeline Engineering, Ralph B. Peck, and Charles Martin Duke Lifeline Earthquake Engineering Awards, as well as the Le Val Lund Award for Practicing Lifeline Risk Reduction. He gave the 2016 Terzaghi Lecture and is receiving the George W. Housner Medal from EERI at the 2016 Annual Meeting. He served as President of the Earthquake Engineering Research Institute (EERI) and as the chair or member of many professional society committees. He authored or co-authored over 370 technical publications. His research interests cover geotechnical engineering, earthquake engineering, underground construction technologies, engineering for large, geographically distributed systems, and geographic information technologies and database management. He has served on numerous government advisory boards, as well as the consulting boards or peer reviews for many projects associated with highway, rapid transit, water supply, and energy distribution systems.
Abstract: Lifelines are often grouped into six principal systems, including electric power, gas and liquid fuels, telecommunications, transportation, water, and wastewater systems. They are intricately linked with the economic well-being, security, and social fabric of the communities they serve, and may be regarded as the complex of delivery systems that define modern society and the communities within it. Professor O'Rourke will focus on lifelines as geographically distributed systems subject to various hazards, variations in hazard, and variable and uncertain conditions of repair and proximity to other lifelines. He will address approaches to mitigation by summarizing key lessons learned about lifelines during extreme events, including earthquakes, hurricanes, floods, and accidents. He will identify common features of lifeline systems that affect their performance under multi-hazard conditions, and will provide examples of critical dependencies and interdependencies among lifelines. Finally, he will propose a strategy to mitigate earthquake and other hazards that takes into consideration of the age and declining functionality of our infrastructure, institutional constraints that influence its management, and the local and global impacts that affect community resilience.

Craig Davis, Los Angeles Water System Seismic Resilience Program

Author bio: Craig A. Davis, Ph.D., PE, GE is the Water System Resilience Program Manager and the Seismic Manager for the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power, Water System. Formerly he held the positions of Geotechnical Engineering and Trunk Line Design Manager and oversaw nearly a billion dollars in the dam and reservoir development, large diameter pipeline installations, and Water System seismic improvement programs. Dr. Davis is currently developing a comprehensive LA Water System seismic resilience and sustainability program. He is a California licensed Civil and Geotechnical Engineer and received a B.S. in Civil Engineering from the California Polytechnic State University in San Louis Obispo, CA, an M.S. in Civil Engineering with emphasis in structural earthquake engineering from the University of Southern California in 1991, and a Ph.D. in Civil Engineering with emphasis in geotechnical earthquake engineering from the University of Southern California in 2000. He has worked for the LADWP since 1987 where he has investigated and evaluated numerous dams, managed several multimillion dollar projects, and implemented unique and innovative designs. Dr. Davis is appointed to the National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program (NEHRP) Advisory Committee on Earthquake Hazards Reduction (ACEHR). He is the founding Executive Committee chairperson for the ASCE Infrastructure Resilience Division. Dr. Davis participates in many other national and international professional committees involved in geotechnical engineering and lifeline system resilience and is the founding vice president of the International Society of Lifeline and Infrastructure Earthquake Engineering. Dr. Davis has also organized and coordinated numerous international workshops and symposiums on geotechnical engineering and lifeline system resilience.
Abstract: The Los Angeles Water System is implementing a Seismic Resilience Program as part of a larger plan to improve the City's seismic resilience as outlined in the Resilience by Design report released by the Mayor December 8, 2014. The Water System Seismic Resilience Program comprehensively integrates into all aspects of water system business. The purpose is to continually improve the Water System seismic resilience in a manner that ensures its seismic sustainability and improves the resilience and sustainability of Los Angeles. Water System resilience is critical for providing the water delivery, quality, quantity, fire protection, and functionality service categories, all necessary for supporting community resilience. The goal of a resilient Water System is to limit the total number of service losses and restore the water service categories as rapidly as possible while protecting property, life safety, and the regional social and economic stability. This presentation reviews the Los Angeles Water System resiliency then provides brief descriptions of recommendations and potential tasks which may be implemented to accomplish the recommendations. Key aspects presented include: (1) Methods for improving the reliability of the Los Angeles aqueduct crossing of the San Andreas fault (SAF) and ability to provide water following a SAF earthquake; (2) the formation of a Seismic Resilient Water Supply Task Force consisting of three major water supply agencies for Southern California, the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power, the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California, and the California Department of Water Resources. The Task Force was created in 2015 to identify impacts of a seismic event which may impair imported water supply aqueducts, and to address the identified impacts with a regional approach; (3) Developing a Seismic Resilient Pipe Network; (4) Addressing the fire following earthquake risks in Los Angeles; and (5) creating a Resilient Expert Panel to provide independent expert input for the Los Angeles Water System Resilience Program.

Tom Shantz, Caltrans

Author bio: Tom Shantz is a senior research engineer for Caltrans, Division of Research, Innovation, and System Information. Tom’s primary focus is seismic hazard and geotechnical engineering. He manages Caltrans’ participation in the Pacific Earthquake Engineering Research (PEER) Center-Lifelines Program and works to implement their research in Caltrans.
Abstract: Caltrans began addressing seismic deficiencies in our bridges following the 1971 San Fernando earthquake. While initially limited to installation of cable restrainers, the retrofit program rapidly expanded its scope following the 1987 Whittier Narrows earthquake and 20 years of intensive retrofitting followed. Non-toll bridges were retrofitted to meet a non-collapse performance goal while toll bridges were retrofitted to meet higher, bridge specific, performance goals. In all, roughly 2200 State owned bridges, 1250 locally owned bridges, and 7 major toll bridges were retrofitted or replaced. Last year, Caltrans initiated an effort to reassess State bridges for seismic vulnerability since the bulk of seismic retrofits occurred about 20 years ago. Since that time ground motion models have improved and previously unknown faults have been identified. Caltrans design practice has evolved as well, including the adoption of probabilistic procedures that increase design seismic loads near active faults. Also, for the first time, State bridges are being screened for liquefaction hazard and potential fault offset. On the research front bridge fragility has been the focus of several recent or on-going studies. Mechanistic based fragility models for new bridges have been developed and are now being cautiously applied. More challenging is the development of fragility models for existing bridges since these bridges reflect an extraordinary diversity of geometries, structural systems, age of construction and design standard. An on-going research study is addressing this complexity through the development of a detailed classification system based on bridge attributes found to have a large impact on fragility. Fragility models will be developed based on this classification system. Looking to the future, Caltrans recognizes that the single bridge focus of current fragility efforts must be extended to a more comprehensive assessment of a highway corridor. Corridor fragilities must include consideration of multiple bridges and the roadway itself. Operational performance characterization will involve a complex interaction of individual bridge performance, roadway performance, and potential reuse of arterials. As corridor performance estimates develop, prioritization decisions will be at the forefront. These decisions will be challenging as the needs of numerous stakeholders are considered. Scenario planning exercises should help to identify issues, facilitate discussion, and build consensus.

Dan Wade, SFPUC

Author bio: Daniel L. Wade, P.E., G.E., is the Director of SFPUC's $4.8 billion Water System Improvement Program (WSIP). At over 90 percent complete, the WSIP is one of the largest water infrastructure programs in the country, and will enable the SFPUC to provide reliable, affordable, high quality water in an environmentally sustainable manner to its 26 wholesale customers located throughout the Bay Area and to retail customers in San Francisco. The WSIP includes 83 water infrastructure projects, including the construction of a new dam, three tunnels, an ultraviolet treatment facility and large-diameter pipelines, as well as the rehabilitation and upgrades of existing storage, treatment and transmission facilities. The WSIP has received extensive industry awards and recognition, and Mr. Wade was recently named one of the 25 Top Newsmakers by Engineering News Record (ENR) magazine. Mr. Wade earned his B.S. Degree in Civil Engineering from the University of California at Berkeley, and his M.S. Degree in Civil/Geotechnical Engineering from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. Prior to joining the SFPUC in 2007, he worked as a consultant for 18 years in the water infrastructure industry as Principal Engineer and Vice President with MWH Americas.
Abstract: Program Director Dan Wade will provide an inside look at the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission's (SFPUC) Water System Improvement Program (WSIP), a $4.8 billion program to repair, replace and upgrade critical portions of the Hetch Hetchy Regional Water System that serves more than 2.6 million customers in the Bay Area. In late 2002, voters approved a bond measure to allow the SFPUC to embark on this multi-year capital improvement program to upgrade its potable water system for purposes of improving seismic and delivery reliability, as well as meeting water quality requirements and long-term water supply goals. At over 90 percent completion, the WSIP is the largest infrastructure program ever undertaken by the City and the County of San Francisco and one of the largest water infrastructure programs in the nation. Mr. Wade will present background information on the WSIP, including the need for the program, criteria used to establish level of service (LOS) goals, prioritization of projects, challenges, and risks as well as the current status of the program. The program includes 83 projects spread across seven counties from California's Sierra foothills to San Francisco, including large diameter pipelines, tunnels, pump stations, treatment plants, dams and reservoirs. Several of the key WSIP projects will be presented. Mr. Wade will also discuss the need for continued long-term investment in the system to maintain the levels of service achieved by the WSIP.

Kent Ferre, PG&E

Author bio: Kent Ferre is Manager of the Geosciences Department at Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) in San Francisco, CA. He manages PG&E’s Earthquake Risk Management Program for the gas, electric and corporate real estate business units. Mr. Ferre is the Project Manager for the Diablo Canyon Seismic Hazard Update project. Mr. Ferre has over 30 years experience at PG&E working as a Design Engineer, Project Engineer, and Project Manager in many departments including Substation Engineering, Gas Transmission, and Power Generation. Mr. Ferre has been in the Geosciences Department since 1997. He is a Registered Civil and Structural Engineer in California.
Abstract: The goal of the seismic risk management program at PG&E is to systematically reduce earthquake risks to an acceptable level, and to manage residual risks such that safety, damage control, and timely restoration of service are assured. The program is implemented by an interdisciplinary technical task force teams, reviewed by a steering committee consisting of department directors and vice presidents. All PG&E facilities except nuclear plants and dams (nuclear plants and hydro dams fall under the regulatory requirements of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the California Division of Safety of Dams respectively) are evaluated using consistent criteria according to potential impact on safety and importance to PG&E and its customers, and according to earthquake exposure and vulnerability. Those facilities that have significant risk of unacceptable earthquake performance are further evaluated and prioritized for mitigative action. Independent inspection, peer review, and verification are carried out to assure the company that the desired levels of earthquake performance of facilities and their operational systems are being achieved.

Hans-Erik Blomgren, Arup

Author bio: Hans-Erik Blomgren, a native of the Pacific Northwest, is an Associate and lead Structural Engineer in Arup's Seattle office with more than 18 years of experience in the design and construction of commercial development in the United States and across the globe. He has played a leading role in the design of the some of the region's most iconic structures such as the Seattle Central Library, Experience Music Project, and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation Headquarters Campus. The recent advancement of timber technologies in Europe and Canada have been studied and applied by Arup which is a multidisciplinary engineering firm working in 92 offices in 40 countries. Hans-Erik is recognized nationally for his role in cultivating and providing foresight for the application of these technologies in North American markets. Most recently Arup has had the fortune of being lead technical consultants for both the east and west coast USDA Tall Wood Building prize competition winners. When completed, they will be the first 10 story or taller full structural timber buildings in the United States.
Abstract: Wood construction has been traditionally utilized to reduce inertial demands in high seismic regions. Applications however are often limited to low-rise buildings of light-wood construction with distributed load bearing shear walls. Recent advancements in timber technologies are pushing mass timber systems into larger commercial scale markets where steel and concrete systems currently dominate the landscape. In high seismic regions, mass timber buildings currently lack code-defined lateral force resisting systems. This paper presents a new concept of seismic force resisting system, known as the Heavy Timber Buckling Restrained Braced Frame. The system is intended, although not limited, for application to tall building timber construction, and is inspired by the unbonded brace technology today widely spread throughout Japan and the United States. In order to prequalify the system for future implementation in building codes, the paper first addresses component testing of a brace consisting of a steel core and a mechanically laminated glulam casing acting as the buckling-restraint mechanism. Test results are discussed and implementation at the system level in an archetype building is studied in order to assess overall system-level performance, constructability, and connection detailing.

Keri Ryan, University of Nevada-Reno

Author bio: Keri Ryan is an Associate Professor of Civil Engineering and a member of the Center for Civil Engineering Earthquake Research at the University of Nevada, Reno. She specializes in earthquake engineering and protective systems for high seismic performance, with application to buildings and bridges. She was the PI of the NSF funded Tools for Isolation and Protective Systems (TIPS) project to address impediments to the wider application of seismic isolation systems, and she led an international collaborative test program between the U.S. and Japan that conducted earthquake testing of a full scale building comparing conventional and alternative construction approaches. Ongoing research examines ways to ensure that high seismic performance objectives can be met. She has authored more than 50 publications on topics related to seismic isolation, high seismic performance, and life cycle analysis of structures.
Abstract: Through a Memorandum of Understanding between the U.S. Network for Earthquake Engineering Simulation (NEES) and Japan's National Institute of Earth Science and Disaster Prevention, a full-scale shaking table test of a 5-story base-isolated was carried out at Japan's Hyogo Earthquake Engineering Research Center (E-Defense) in 2011. The building was tested with two different isolation systems (triple pendulum bearings and a hybrid system of lead-rubber bearings and low-friction rolling cross-linear bearings) and in the fixed-base configuration. The tested building had a realistic floor system, nonstructural components (suspended ceilings, sprinkler piping and interior walls), and furnishings, and was subjected to strong earthquake shaking. The tests served as a full-scale proof of the concept of seismic isolation to protect the building from damage in very strong earthquake shaking; for instance, displacement demands across the isolation system were more than twice what has been observed in any previous earthquake event. However, the nonstructural components and furnishings were not completely protected from damage, and the tests showed that these items were sensitive to the vertical component of ground shaking, which is unaffected by the seismic isolation system. While the overall performance of the isolation systems was very impressive when considered against other available options for seismic protection, the tests highlight the challenge of designing a building to remain immediately operational following a large earthquake. This presentation will summarize the test program, present the major findings, and discuss future directions in research and design practice.

Reid Zimmerman, KPFF Consulting Engineers

Author bio: Reid Zimmerman is a graduate of the University of California Berkeley and is currently an Associate with KPFF Consulting Engineers in Portland, OR. His career has focused on the analysis and design of advanced structural systems and emerging technologies in regions of high seismicity. Reid often pursues performance-based seismic design using nonlinear response history analysis on his projects and enjoys educating owners on the benefits of enhanced seismic performance. He also sits on select national code development committees on these topics.
Abstract: The use of mass timber walls as a lateral force-resisting system in regions of high seismicity has gained recent interest in the United States. Mass timber walls, in the form of cross-laminated timber (CLT), laminated veneer lumber (LVL), laminated strand lumber (LSL), or similar, have been implemented outside the United States in lateral force-resisting systems, almost exclusively for wind load. Mass timber walls are natural candidates as a component in a rocking/re-centering system, owing to their inherent tendency to rock. While code provisions and design guidance for mass timber walls is sparse, when used in a rocking/re centering system, they can emulate a rocking precast concrete wall for which an approved code path exists. Additionally, their use in a rocking/re-centering system encourages consideration of beyond-code performance (e.g., low damage design, repairability design, etc.). Current implementation of re-centering mass timber walls in the United States is through the performance-based procedures of ASCE/SEI 7, typically substantiated through nonlinear response history analysis. Extending mass timber walls to taller buildings in the United States is feasible; however, it requires an additional level of thoughtful design, explicit analysis and testing, and careful detailing. These include: • Deformation compatibility of gravity connections—These connections are typically concealed for architectural reasons and, to date, have not been tested to story drifts expected of a tall building in a high seismic region. • Shear modulus of wood—Compared to reinforced concrete and steel, the ratio of an equivalent shear modulus to the elastic modulus of wood is much smaller. This results in the greater significance of shear deformations. Furthermore, equivalent shear moduli for mass timber panels, such as CLT, are not well bounded in the current literature and research. • Serviceability under wind loads—As re-centering mass timber wall buildings become taller, the effect of wind loads on base rocking and floor accelerations begins to become a critical aspect of design. • Post-tensioning loss—Post-tensioning loss due to wood creep and moisture change can be more significant than for a comparable precast concrete wall. This is further exacerbated in a tall building. The presentation will feature select examples from a case study project, Framework. The Framework Project is currently under design by KPFF Consulting Engineers and recently won the U.S. Tall Wood Building Prize Competition https://tallwoodbuildingcompetition.org Findings from a collaborative research project between the University of California Los Angeles and KPFF Consulting Engineers on the application of rocking/re-centering concrete walls for tall buildings will also be presented for comparisons against tall mass timber buildings.

James Ricles, Lehigh University

Author bio: James M. Ricles is the Bruce G. Johnston Professor of Structural Engineering and a faculty member of the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Lehigh University. James is also the Director of the Real-time Multidirectional Facility for Seismic Performance Simulation of Large-Scale Structural Systems, a NHERI Experimental Facility located at Lehigh University. James received his B.S. and M.S. from the University of Texas, Austin in Architectural and Civil Engineering, respectively, and Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley. His current research interests include: (1) seismic hazard mitigation and development of resilient buildings and bridges using innovative structural systems, including self-centering concepts as well as passive and semi-active controlled devices for earthquake damage reduction; (2) behavior of structural steel connections, members, and systems under extreme loading conditions, including seismic, fire, and blast loading; (3) real-time hybrid simulation for performance evaluation of structural systems under dynamic loading conditions. As the Director of the Lehigh NHERI Experimental Facility, James has been leading the development in large-scale real-time hybrid simulation, a technique that enables the development and experimental validation of resilient structural system concepts. He is a registered professional engineer in the State of California, and active in working with industry to disseminate and promote concepts for structural resiliency. James has published over 450 peer-reviewed journal papers, conference papers, and technical reports based in his research. He has received numerous research awards, including the 2013 American Institute of Construction Special Achievement Award (AISC) for his work related to designing steel structures for earthquake loading, including moment resisting connections and self-centering frames. Other noteworthy awards include the American Society of Civil Engineers Raymond C. Reese Research Prize, the National Science Foundation Presidential Young Investigator Award, the NASA Research Fellowship Award, and the Lincoln Arc Welding Foundation Chairman’s Award for Outstanding Achievement in Arc Welded Design.
Abstract: Unlike conventional steel special concentrically-braced frames (SCBFs), rocking self-centering (SC) concentrically-braced frames (SC-CBFs) are designed to suffer no significant structural damage under the design basis earthquake (DBE), enabling the building to be functional after the DBE. Similar to conventional structural systems, SC-CBFs are designed to avoid collapse under the maximum considered earthquake (MCE). In general, SC systems have several features: the lateral force-drift behavior softens without inelastic deformation of the structural members; this softening behavior is created by gap opening at selected post-tensioned connections; and energy dissipation under seismic loading is not from damage to main structural members, but from energy dissipation elements that are specified in the design process. The seismic behavior of the SC-CBF is characterized by uplift of one column of the frame after the base overturning moment is large enough to overcome precompression of the column to the foundation from vertically-oriented post-tensioning bars. After column decompression and uplift, the behavior of the CBF is dominated by rigid body rotation (i.e., rocking). The presentation will show results of large-scale hybrid earthquake simulations on SC-CBF laboratory specimens, as well as numerical simulation results. The SC-CBF in this study was designed for no structural damage under the DBE, and minimal damage under the MCE. The simulations showed that these objectives were satisfied.

Robert B. Olshansky, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Author bio: Robert B. Olshansky, Ph.D., FAICP, is Professor and Head of the Department of Urban and Regional Planning, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, where he has taught for 25 years. His teaching and research cover land use and environmental planning, with an emphasis on planning for natural hazards. He has published extensively on post-disaster recovery planning, planning and policy for earthquake risks, hillside planning and landslide policy, and environmental impact assessment. Professor Olshansky has studied recovery planning and management after several major disasters. For over a decade, he and colleagues researched the recovery process following the Kobe, Japan earthquake of 1995, and he spent the 2004-05 and 2012-13 academic years as a Visiting Professor at Kyoto University. His co-authored research report, Opportunity in Chaos: Rebuilding after the 1994 Northridge and 1995 Kobe Earthquakes, is available online. His current work focuses on developing theory and researching the processes of recovery following catastrophic disasters. He researched and advised the post-Katrina planning process in New Orleans, and his book, Clear as Mud: Planning for the Rebuilding of New Orleans, co-authored with Laurie Johnson, was published by APA Press in April 2010. He and collaborators-with support from the National Science Foundation and University of Illinois-have researched and published on disaster recovery in Sichuan Province, China; Tamil Nadu, India; Taiwan; Indonesia; Haiti; and Niigata Prefecture and Tohoku, Japan. In 2014 he co-edited a special issue of the Journal of the American Planning Association on Planning for Disaster Recovery.

William Siembieda, Cal Poly-SLO

Author bio: William Siembieda, is Professor of City and Regional Planning and directs the College of Architecture and Environmental Design’s Resilient Communities Research Institute at California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, CA. Research areas include disaster mitigation planning, recovery theory, resiliency planning, and the operation of urban land markets. Recent work includes codirecting the State of California Multi-Hazard Mitigation Plan, and the Climate Adaptation Planning Guide. International work includes research at the Disaster Prevention Research Institute, Kyoto University, Japan, and the Joint Center for Disaster Research, Massey University, New Zealand. He is a disaster recovery subject matter expert to the World Bank, the Asian Development Bank, the US Department of Homeland Security, and the Chilean National Research Center for Integrated Disaster Management. A Fulbright Scholar and a Fulbright Specialist; Dr. Siembieda holds a Ph.D. in Urban Planning from the University of California, Los Angeles and an Economics B.A. from the University of California, Berkeley. He was a member of the 2010 EERI Chile LFE team and the 2014 GEER team on flooding and earthquakes in Christchurch, NZ. Recent scholarship includes: “The role of the built environment in the recovery of cities and communities from extreme events,” International Journal of Mass Emergencies and Disasters; “Rebuild fast but rebuild better: Chile’s initial recovery following the 27F earthquake and tsunami,” Earthquake Spectra, Journal of the Earthquake Engineering Research Institute; and “Transactions and friction as concepts to guide Disaster recovery policy,” International Journal of Disaster Risk Science, and “The Crisis Management System in Japan.” in Japan: A Precarious Future. (2015) New York University Press.
Abstract: In 2015 Chile experienced three seismic events of 6.7-8.3Mw. There was minor damage from these events, and well-executed tsunami evacuations in coastal cities. There also were extreme flash floods and mudslides in the Atacama region (about 800 km north of Santiago), some of which included large amounts of contaminated soils. In 2014 there also was a massive WUI fire in Valparaiso (70 km west of Santiago) in six heavily populated ravines. This presentation focuses on the flooding and fire events, examining the recovery and reconstruction efforts and how the Chilean crisis management system is addressing these events in the most impacted cities.

Lizzie Blaisdell, Build Change

Author bio: Lizzie Blaisdell is the Director of Engineering for Build Change, a non-profit social enterprise that works with people in emerging nations to build houses and schools that don't collapse in earthquakes and windstorms. Since 2013, she has worked with the engineering teams in each of Build Change's programs to provide technical assistance to communities rebuilding after disasters, such as the 2010 earthquake in Haiti, the 2013 earthquake in Aceh, Indonesia, Typhoon Yolanda in the Philippines, and the earthquake in Nepal last April, as well as to communities implementing disaster mitigation programs, such as the City of Bogotå. She is a registered structural engineer in the State of California. Prior to working with Build Change, Lizzie had the pleasure of working at Degenkolb Engineers in San Francisco for nearly 8 years after receiving her Masters in Science at the SEMM program in U.C. Berkeley.

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The 2016 Annual Meeting will be held at the Parc 55 San Francisco, A Hilton Hotel. See location on map below.